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Remington's The Dizz isn't looking for new ownership after all

Owners of Remington's The Dizz have decided not to sell after all.
Owners of Remington's The Dizz have decided not to sell after all. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)

The Dizz is staying just as it is.

Owners Darlene and Thomas Basta, who had decided to retire and put the popular Remington bar and eatery up for sale back in September, have decided not to sell.

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“They did get some offers,” said Lynn Szybist, executive assistant to the owners. But in the end, she said, the Bastas just didn’t have the heart to sell.

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“There was such a big outpouring of disappointment and also support from the community,” Szybist said. “People were crying… These people were like family.”

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The Bastas, who re-christened what had been known as Dizzy Issie’s as The Dizz in 2008, made the decision to take it off the market late last week, Szybist said.

“It’s been such an anchor of this community for so long,” she said.

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The first liquor license was issued to a bar at the 300 W. 30th St. location in 1934, according to a history on The Dizz’s website. Known then as Mitchells, it operated under that name until 1972, when new management changed the name to Stu’s Lounge. The bar was later known as Tony’s Place, Igor’s and Buckley’s before becoming Dizzy Issie’s in 1997.

Szybist and the Bastas are working on some new promotions for The Dizz, she said, noting the last-minute reprieve should “bring some fresh excitement [to] the business.”

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