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60 years ago today, Baltimore was also dealing with a March snowstorm

A glimpse of The Sun's front page from March 21, 1958. The main picture's caption reads: CRASH LANDING -- For this house at 4503 Liberty Heights avenue, the collapse of a large tree toppled by the snow meant a damaged roof.
A glimpse of The Sun's front page from March 21, 1958. The main picture's caption reads: CRASH LANDING -- For this house at 4503 Liberty Heights avenue, the collapse of a large tree toppled by the snow meant a damaged roof. (Baltimore Sun files)

In 1958, Baltimore’s March 19-21 storm began innocently with a wet snow.

Soon live electrical wires were being pulled down by the weight of the heavy, freezing snow. Families lost power. Newspaper photographers shot scenes of families baking potatoes in fireplaces.

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Baltimore, Harford and Cecil counties were inundated with the nasty weather.

Cars sit stranded on snow-packed roads, during the storm of March 1958. A downed tree sits off to the right.
Cars sit stranded on snow-packed roads, during the storm of March 1958. A downed tree sits off to the right. (Baltimore Sun files)
The Evening Sun's front page on March 21, 1958.
The Evening Sun's front page on March 21, 1958. (Baltimore Sun files)

A shed collapsed and killed Charles C. Cook, a dairy farmer in Baldwin. The Sun reported that heavy, watery snow, 2-feet deep, slid off the main barn roof onto the ancillary structure. The paper also reported that his neighbors dug toward the sound of voices at the farm. The elder Cook died, but his son survived.

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Downed electrical lines from the heavy wet snow from the March 1958 storm left many without power for weeks.
Downed electrical lines from the heavy wet snow from the March 1958 storm left many without power for weeks. (Baltimore Sun files)

The storm brought Baltimore’s streetcar and bus fleet to a stop. Lines of stranded streetcars filled Belair Road. Parts of Harford County remained without power for weeks.

With up to 12 inches of possible in the Baltimore region through Wednesday, here’s hoping history doesn’t repeat itself in 2018.

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