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This Day in History: Dec. 1

A Montgomery (Ala.) Sheriff's Department booking photo of Rosa Parks taken Feb 22, 1956, is shown Friday, July 23, 2004, in Montgomery, Ala. Dozens of photographs from the civil rights-era were recently discovered in a storage room used by the Montgomery County Sheriff's office. Chief Deputy Derrick Cunningham said he was performing some house cleaning duties when he found a photo-album containing well-preserved mug shots of protesters, including Parks and The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. who were arrested during the Montgomery bus boycott in 1956. (AP Photo/Montgomery County (Ala.) Sheriff's office)
A Montgomery (Ala.) Sheriff's Department booking photo of Rosa Parks taken Feb 22, 1956, is shown Friday, July 23, 2004, in Montgomery, Ala. Dozens of photographs from the civil rights-era were recently discovered in a storage room used by the Montgomery County Sheriff's office. Chief Deputy Derrick Cunningham said he was performing some house cleaning duties when he found a photo-album containing well-preserved mug shots of protesters, including Parks and The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. who were arrested during the Montgomery bus boycott in 1956. (AP Photo/Montgomery County (Ala.) Sheriff's office) (Associated Press)

In 1955, Rosa Parks, a black seamstress, was arrested after refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Alabama, city bus; the incident sparked a year-long boycott of the buses by blacks.

1824: The presidential election was turned over to the U.S. House of Representatives when a deadlock developed between John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford and Henry Clay. (Adams ended up the winner.)

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1862: President Abraham Lincoln sent his Second Annual Message to Congress, in which he called for the abolition of slavery, and went on to say, "Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history. We of this Congress and this administration will be remembered in spite of ourselves."

1965: An airlift of refugees from Cuba to the United States began in which thousands of Cubans were allowed to leave their homeland.

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