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Quintessential Old Baltimore

The Bard of Baltimore, for decades the proud wielder of America's most acerbic pen, was an Evening Sun mainstay for decades (which is why he's quoted on the wall of our Calvert Street lobby). But we'd include him even if he wrote for somebody else.
(Robert F. Kniesche, Baltimore Sun photo)

Quintessential Old Baltimore

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Baltimoreans love nostalgia. And we're here to celebrate that often sepia-toned city that lives in memory -- the Baltimore of Hutzler's, the Congress Hotel, Jerry Turner and Al Sanders, Martick's Restaurant Francais and Read's drugstores. Invoking the ghosts of Baltimore's past, we've plumbed the depths of The Baltimore Sun's expansive photo archive and here present 50 signature images (in random order) that link to that past. -- Chris Kaltenbach  READ MORE AT RETRO BALTIMORE
The Bard of Baltimore, for decades the proud wielder of America's most acerbic pen, was an Evening Sun mainstay for decades (which is why he's quoted on the wall of our Calvert Street lobby). But we'd include him even if he wrote for somebody else.
The Bard of Baltimore, for decades the proud wielder of America's most acerbic pen, was an Evening Sun mainstay for decades (which is why he's quoted on the wall of our Calvert Street lobby). But we'd include him even if he wrote for somebody else. (Robert F. Kniesche, Baltimore Sun photo)

The long-time mayor of Baltimore (from 1947-59) and Little Italy mainstay helped bring the major-league Orioles home (in 1954, when the hapless St. Louis Browns relocated here) and was the sire of a political legacy that included a future mayor (Thomas D'Alesandro III) and Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (Nancy Pelosi).
The long-time mayor of Baltimore (from 1947-59) and Little Italy mainstay helped bring the major-league Orioles home (in 1954, when the hapless St. Louis Browns relocated here) and was the sire of a political legacy that included a future mayor (Thomas D'Alesandro III) and Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (Nancy Pelosi). (William Klender, Baltimore Sun photo)

The greatest quarterback in the history of the NFL. Here in Baltimore, to suggest otherwise is to pick a fight.
The greatest quarterback in the history of the NFL. Here in Baltimore, to suggest otherwise is to pick a fight. (Richard Stacks, Baltimore Sun photo)

As a scribe for the Baltimore News American and, after it folded in 1984, for The Baltimore Sun, Steadman (pictured, left) set the standard for sports reporting in Charm City. He, almost alone, predicted the Orioles would win the 1966 World Series over the heavily favored L.A. Dodgers. Smart man.
As a scribe for the Baltimore News American and, after it folded in 1984, for The Baltimore Sun, Steadman (pictured, left) set the standard for sports reporting in Charm City. He, almost alone, predicted the Orioles would win the 1966 World Series over the heavily favored L.A. Dodgers. Smart man. (UPI Photo/Soloway)

Home of Baltimore's major outdoor sports teams, including the Colts and Orioles, from 1950-1997. Much as they love Oriole Park at Camden Yards and M&T Bank Stadium, many Baltimore sports fans still shed a tear when they think of Memorial Stadium, where Johnny Unitas and Brooks Robinson spent their big-league careers, where Frank Robinson won a Triple Crown and Art Donovan yielded ground to no man.
Home of Baltimore's major outdoor sports teams, including the Colts and Orioles, from 1950-1997. Much as they love Oriole Park at Camden Yards and M&T Bank Stadium, many Baltimore sports fans still shed a tear when they think of Memorial Stadium, where Johnny Unitas and Brooks Robinson spent their big-league careers, where Frank Robinson won a Triple Crown and Art Donovan yielded ground to no man. (Richard Stacks, Baltimore Sun photo)

A part of Baltimore for generations, these traveling fruit-and-vegetable vendors and their horses have been threatened with extinction repeatedly, but still they soldier on.
A part of Baltimore for generations, these traveling fruit-and-vegetable vendors and their horses have been threatened with extinction repeatedly, but still they soldier on. (Courtesy of Roland L. Freeman, Handout photo, 1971)

"Run right to Read's" was an advertising slogan that Baltimoreans heeded for generations, until the chain was bought out by Rite Aid in the 1980s. The lunch counter of the flagship store, at Howard and Lexington streets, was the site of a pre-Rosa Parks civil rights demonstration by Morgan State College students in January 1955; the fate of the long-abandoned building is still being deliberated.
"Run right to Read's" was an advertising slogan that Baltimoreans heeded for generations, until the chain was bought out by Rite Aid in the 1980s. The lunch counter of the flagship store, at Howard and Lexington streets, was the site of a pre-Rosa Parks civil rights demonstration by Morgan State College students in January 1955; the fate of the long-abandoned building is still being deliberated. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

The Bambino was born on Emory Street in Baltimore; his father ran a saloon on Camden Street (near the current centerfield at Oriole Park at Camden Yards) and the Babe spent some 10 years at St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys in West Baltimore before signing with the minor-league Orioles in 1914. Sure, he earned his fame in Boston and New York, but once a Baltimorean, always a Baltimorean.
The Bambino was born on Emory Street in Baltimore; his father ran a saloon on Camden Street (near the current centerfield at Oriole Park at Camden Yards) and the Babe spent some 10 years at St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys in West Baltimore before signing with the minor-league Orioles in 1914. Sure, he earned his fame in Boston and New York, but once a Baltimorean, always a Baltimorean. (Leroy Merriken, Baltimore Sun file photo, 1931)

To watch Brooks Robinson play third base, which he did for the Orioles from 1955 to 1977, was to observe perfection. The man could hit, too, but it was his glove that earned him a place in baseball's Hall of Fame, and in the hearts of Orioles fans everywhere.
To watch Brooks Robinson play third base, which he did for the Orioles from 1955 to 1977, was to observe perfection. The man could hit, too, but it was his glove that earned him a place in baseball's Hall of Fame, and in the hearts of Orioles fans everywhere. (Paul Hutchins, Baltimore Sun photo, August 1965)

The 33 locations of Baltimore's favorite restaurant chain served as neighborhood gathering places from 1932 into the 1990s. True Baltimoreans know that Starbucks has nothing on a hot cup of Joe from a White Coffee Pot.
The 33 locations of Baltimore's favorite restaurant chain served as neighborhood gathering places from 1932 into the 1990s. True Baltimoreans know that Starbucks has nothing on a hot cup of Joe from a White Coffee Pot. (Paul Hutchins, Baltimore Sun photo)

Mayor for life. Hizzoner. Mayor Annoyed. Willie Don. You don't earn that many nicknames unless you've been loved and admired (or hated and despised) by lots of people; no Baltimore mayor wore the title more proudly. Sure, he served eight years as governor of Maryland after leaving City Hall in 1987, but he'll always be Mayor Schaefer to us.
Mayor for life. Hizzoner. Mayor Annoyed. Willie Don. You don't earn that many nicknames unless you've been loved and admired (or hated and despised) by lots of people; no Baltimore mayor wore the title more proudly. Sure, he served eight years as governor of Maryland after leaving City Hall in 1987, but he'll always be Mayor Schaefer to us. (Lloyd Pearson, Baltimore Sun photo)

The German food was delicious, the artwork omnipresent (so much so that it fetched more than $10 million when it was auctioned off at Sotheby's), the giant ball of string endearingly quirky. Highlandtown just hasn't been the same since Haussner's closed up shop in 1999.
The German food was delicious, the artwork omnipresent (so much so that it fetched more than $10 million when it was auctioned off at Sotheby's), the giant ball of string endearingly quirky. Highlandtown just hasn't been the same since Haussner's closed up shop in 1999. (Amy Davis, Baltimore Sun photo)

Bare-bones seafood joints like Connolly's, which closed in 1991, once ringed the Inner Harbor area; it was a safe bet that the crabs you ate there in the afternoon had been harvested from the bay that morning. They don't make 'em like Connolly's anymore.
Bare-bones seafood joints like Connolly's, which closed in 1991, once ringed the Inner Harbor area; it was a safe bet that the crabs you ate there in the afternoon had been harvested from the bay that morning. They don't make 'em like Connolly's anymore. (Amy Davis, Baltimore Sun photo)

For much of the 20th century, the 1000 block of E. Lombard St. was Baltimore's go-to lunch stop; names like Weiss', Jack's and Attman's still make the mouth water. Go ahead and have yourself a corned beef sandwich; happily, Attman's is still there.
For much of the 20th century, the 1000 block of E. Lombard St. was Baltimore's go-to lunch stop; names like Weiss', Jack's and Attman's still make the mouth water. Go ahead and have yourself a corned beef sandwich; happily, Attman's is still there. (Baltimore Sun file photo, 1939)

This memorial to the men who died defending their city during the War of 1812's Battle of Baltimore (which occurred in September 1814, a juxtaposition of dates that has confounded schoolchildren for generations) was completed in 1825. That's it on the city's flag and seal. (Pictured: Battle Monument rubber collection during World War II)
This memorial to the men who died defending their city during the War of 1812's Battle of Baltimore (which occurred in September 1814, a juxtaposition of dates that has confounded schoolchildren for generations) was completed in 1825. That's it on the city's flag and seal. (Pictured: Battle Monument rubber collection during World War II) (Baltimore Sun file photo, 1942)

Find this red, white and blue buoy out in the middle of Baltimore Harbor, and you've reached the spot from which Francis Scott Key watched the bombardment of Fort McHenry on the night of Sept. 12, 1814. You might have heard a poem he wrote about it, one that talks about "the rockets' red glare" and "bombs bursting in air."
Find this red, white and blue buoy out in the middle of Baltimore Harbor, and you've reached the spot from which Francis Scott Key watched the bombardment of Fort McHenry on the night of Sept. 12, 1814. You might have heard a poem he wrote about it, one that talks about "the rockets' red glare" and "bombs bursting in air." (Baltimore Sun file photo)

Baltimore's last surviving movie palace opened in 1939 and is still showing movies. A $3.5 million renovation completed in October 2013, just in time for its 75th anniversary, restored the building's art-deco splendor. (Pictured: Baltimore filmmaker John Waters and Harris Glenn Milstead - aka Divine - at the 1988 premiere of "Hairspray" at the Senator Theatre.)
Baltimore's last surviving movie palace opened in 1939 and is still showing movies. A $3.5 million renovation completed in October 2013, just in time for its 75th anniversary, restored the building's art-deco splendor. (Pictured: Baltimore filmmaker John Waters and Harris Glenn Milstead - aka Divine - at the 1988 premiere of "Hairspray" at the Senator Theatre.) (Amy Davis, Baltimore Sun photo)

Opened in 1903 as the Hotel Kernan (pictured), this glorious six-story French Renaissance Revival-style building may be the most historic entertainment venue in the city. Charlie Chaplin and Fred Astaire are said to have performed here; Henry Fonda and Margaret Sullavan got married here. Its fabled basement club, The Marble Bar, served as the epicenter of Baltimore's punk and new wave music scene in the 1970s and '80s, welcoming acts from Muddy Waters and Papa John Creach to The Ramones and R.E.M.
Opened in 1903 as the Hotel Kernan (pictured), this glorious six-story French Renaissance Revival-style building may be the most historic entertainment venue in the city. Charlie Chaplin and Fred Astaire are said to have performed here; Henry Fonda and Margaret Sullavan got married here. Its fabled basement club, The Marble Bar, served as the epicenter of Baltimore's punk and new wave music scene in the 1970s and '80s, welcoming acts from Muddy Waters and Papa John Creach to The Ramones and R.E.M. (Handout photo)

Baltimore's last amusement park closed for good in 1973, in the wake of extensive damage caused by Hurricane Agnes. Some remember the park for its role in the city's civil rights struggle; in July 1963, demonstrators demanded Gwynn Oak be integrated (by August, it was). Others remember it for rides like the Wild Mouse, as scary a roller coaster as any 12-year-old Baltimorean would ever want to ride.
Baltimore's last amusement park closed for good in 1973, in the wake of extensive damage caused by Hurricane Agnes. Some remember the park for its role in the city's civil rights struggle; in July 1963, demonstrators demanded Gwynn Oak be integrated (by August, it was). Others remember it for rides like the Wild Mouse, as scary a roller coaster as any 12-year-old Baltimorean would ever want to ride. (William L. La Force Jr., Baltimore Sun photo)

When Baltimore native Barry Levinson filmed his 1982 movie "Diner" (pictured) in his hometown, he bought an old diner in New Jersey and had it relocated here. It now sits off Saratoga Street, where until recently, hungry visitors could eat just like Boogie and his friends did in the movie. Closed for the time being, its future remains uncertain.
When Baltimore native Barry Levinson filmed his 1982 movie "Diner" (pictured) in his hometown, he bought an old diner in New Jersey and had it relocated here. It now sits off Saratoga Street, where until recently, hungry visitors could eat just like Boogie and his friends did in the movie. Closed for the time being, its future remains uncertain. (Handout photo)

Lady Day, possibly the greatest jazz vocalist ever, spent much of her childhood in Baltimore. Although she was born in Philadelphia, we proudly claim her as our own.
Lady Day, possibly the greatest jazz vocalist ever, spent much of her childhood in Baltimore. Although she was born in Philadelphia, we proudly claim her as our own. (Handout photo)

The epicenter of Baltimore's African-American cultural scene, operating on Pennsylvania Avenue as a sister theater to the Apollo in Harlem, the Howard Theatre in Washington, D.C., the Regal Theater in Chicago and the Earle Theater in Philadelphia, was razed in 1971. A list of performers who played the Royal would fill a page, but here are a few: Fats Waller, Ethel Waters, Pearl Bailey, Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, Etta James, Nat King Cole (pictured), The Temptations and The Supremes.
The epicenter of Baltimore's African-American cultural scene, operating on Pennsylvania Avenue as a sister theater to the Apollo in Harlem, the Howard Theatre in Washington, D.C., the Regal Theater in Chicago and the Earle Theater in Philadelphia, was razed in 1971. A list of performers who played the Royal would fill a page, but here are a few: Fats Waller, Ethel Waters, Pearl Bailey, Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, Etta James, Nat King Cole (pictured), The Temptations and The Supremes. (Phillips & Son Photography, handout photo)

Founded by Colts great Gino Marchetti, Gino's was Baltimore's premier fast-food chain for much of the 1960s and 1970s; McDonald's was strictly a second choice. The last of the original restaurants closed in 1991, but happily, since August 2011, a new generation of Gino Giant hamburgers is being served at the revived chain, with restaurants in Towson, Glen Burnie and elsewhere.
Founded by Colts great Gino Marchetti, Gino's was Baltimore's premier fast-food chain for much of the 1960s and 1970s; McDonald's was strictly a second choice. The last of the original restaurants closed in 1991, but happily, since August 2011, a new generation of Gino Giant hamburgers is being served at the revived chain, with restaurants in Towson, Glen Burnie and elsewhere. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

Perennially ranked among the top one or two hospitals in the country, the Johns Hopkins Hospital is a source of great pride among Baltimoreans, not to mention great health care. Since its opening in 1889, it's also provided a surefire way to tell whether someone is really from Baltimore or not: if you say John Hopkins, you're definitely not from around these parts.
Perennially ranked among the top one or two hospitals in the country, the Johns Hopkins Hospital is a source of great pride among Baltimoreans, not to mention great health care. Since its opening in 1889, it's also provided a surefire way to tell whether someone is really from Baltimore or not: if you say John Hopkins, you're definitely not from around these parts. (William L. Klender, Baltimore Sun photo)

The king of ragtime was a Charm City native, born on Forrest Street in 1887. His compositions include such classics as "Love Will Find a Way" and "I'm Just Wild About Harry."
The king of ragtime was a Charm City native, born on Forrest Street in 1887. His compositions include such classics as "Love Will Find a Way" and "I'm Just Wild About Harry." (Baltimore Sun file photo)

The bandleader who added "hi-de-ho" to the world's music vocabulary and made a cultural icon out of "Minnie the Moocher" moved to Baltimore in 1918, when he was 10. Check out the 1980 movie "The Blues Brothers" -- that's Calloway playing Curtis, the janitor, alongside John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd.
The bandleader who added "hi-de-ho" to the world's music vocabulary and made a cultural icon out of "Minnie the Moocher" moved to Baltimore in 1918, when he was 10. Check out the 1980 movie "The Blues Brothers" -- that's Calloway playing Curtis, the janitor, alongside John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd. (Robert K. Hamilton, Baltimore Sun photo)

The Baltimore native and Frederick Douglass High School grad, appointed chief counsel for the NAACP in 1940, successfully argued against school segregation before the U.S. Supreme Court, which outlawed the practice with its 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision. He was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson in 1967 -- the first African-American to serve on the court -- and remained there until 1991.
The Baltimore native and Frederick Douglass High School grad, appointed chief counsel for the NAACP in 1940, successfully argued against school segregation before the U.S. Supreme Court, which outlawed the practice with its 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision. He was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson in 1967 -- the first African-American to serve on the court -- and remained there until 1991. (Richard Stacks, Baltimore Sun photo)

Among TV anchormen, none were more revered locally than this team, a fixture on WJZ, Channel 13, from 1977 to 1987. Turner (left) came first, starting at the station in 1962; Sanders arrived a decade later. Turner died in 1987, Sanders in 1995. Local news has not been the same since.
Among TV anchormen, none were more revered locally than this team, a fixture on WJZ, Channel 13, from 1977 to 1987. Turner (left) came first, starting at the station in 1962; Sanders arrived a decade later. Turner died in 1987, Sanders in 1995. Local news has not been the same since. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

If you were a young duckpin bowler in Baltimore in the '60s and '70s, your dream was to appear on this Saturday-evening WBAL, Channel 11, show. Host John Bowman would interview you, his warm baritone hopefully making you a little less nervous, and you'd stride onto the WBAL studio lanes to do battle against some equally nervous foe. Win six times, and you retired as an "undefeated champion." Greater glory could no kid imagine. (Pictured: 'Pinbusters' trophy won by WBAL radio reporter John Patti as a youngster.)
If you were a young duckpin bowler in Baltimore in the '60s and '70s, your dream was to appear on this Saturday-evening WBAL, Channel 11, show. Host John Bowman would interview you, his warm baritone hopefully making you a little less nervous, and you'd stride onto the WBAL studio lanes to do battle against some equally nervous foe. Win six times, and you retired as an "undefeated champion." Greater glory could no kid imagine. (Pictured: 'Pinbusters' trophy won by WBAL radio reporter John Patti as a youngster.) (Lloyd Fox, Baltimore Sun photo)

First Miss Nancy, then her daughter, Miss Sally, helped a generation of Baltimore pre-school-age children learn manners, deportment and other essential life skills. Ask anyone in their 50s or older about Mr. Do Bee, the Magic Mirror or the "Romper Room" prayer ("God is great, God is good. Let us thank him for our food. Amen") and prepare to listen as the floodgates of memory open.
First Miss Nancy, then her daughter, Miss Sally, helped a generation of Baltimore pre-school-age children learn manners, deportment and other essential life skills. Ask anyone in their 50s or older about Mr. Do Bee, the Magic Mirror or the "Romper Room" prayer ("God is great, God is good. Let us thank him for our food. Amen") and prepare to listen as the floodgates of memory open. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

We used to think this was the oldest ship in the U.S. Navy, dating to 1797. Turns out it isn't, but it's still old -- built in 1855 -- and proudly welcomes visitors to the Inner Harbor, where it's been berthed since 1968.
We used to think this was the oldest ship in the U.S. Navy, dating to 1797. Turns out it isn't, but it's still old -- built in 1855 -- and proudly welcomes visitors to the Inner Harbor, where it's been berthed since 1968. (Monica Lopossay, Baltimore Sun photo)

For decades the go-to destination for Baltimore shoppers, the corner of Lexington and Howard streets was home to four department stores: Hecht's, Hochschild's, Hutzler's and Stewart's (pictured). For decades, no Christmas was complete without at least one shopping trip to this commercial nerve center. They're all gone now -- Hutzler's remained the longest, closing in 1989.
For decades the go-to destination for Baltimore shoppers, the corner of Lexington and Howard streets was home to four department stores: Hecht's, Hochschild's, Hutzler's and Stewart's (pictured). For decades, no Christmas was complete without at least one shopping trip to this commercial nerve center. They're all gone now -- Hutzler's remained the longest, closing in 1989. (William H. Mortimer, Baltimore Sun photo)

One of opera's greatest sopranos -- no one who ever heard her would debate otherwise -- married Baltimore socialite Carle Jackson in 1936. Shortly thereafter, they moved into Villa Pace, the Greenspring Valley mansion she would call home until her death in 1981. In the 1940s, she was one of the guiding forces behind the founding of the Baltimore Opera Company.
One of opera's greatest sopranos -- no one who ever heard her would debate otherwise -- married Baltimore socialite Carle Jackson in 1936. Shortly thereafter, they moved into Villa Pace, the Greenspring Valley mansion she would call home until her death in 1981. In the 1940s, she was one of the guiding forces behind the founding of the Baltimore Opera Company. (Baltimore Sun file photo, 1936)

A two-time mayor of Baltimore (1943-47 and 1963-67) who served as governor of Maryland from 1951-59 -- and as a Republican, hard to believe in this traditionally Democratic state -- McKeldin was long one of the Free State's most beloved pols. He was also a firm believer in civil rights, when that wasn't always the most popular position for a politician to espouse.
A two-time mayor of Baltimore (1943-47 and 1963-67) who served as governor of Maryland from 1951-59 -- and as a Republican, hard to believe in this traditionally Democratic state -- McKeldin was long one of the Free State's most beloved pols. He was also a firm believer in civil rights, when that wasn't always the most popular position for a politician to espouse. (Clarence B. Garrett, Baltimore Sun photo)

It sure didn't look like a restaurant from the outside. There was no printed menu, and he kept the front door locked. If you were a regular customer, you knew to ring the buzzer to get in. And for nearly four decades, until it closed in 2008, Morris Martick's Restaurant Francais was the best French restaurant in Baltimore. Longtime patrons still dream of his sweet potato soup and bouillabaisse.
It sure didn't look like a restaurant from the outside. There was no printed menu, and he kept the front door locked. If you were a regular customer, you knew to ring the buzzer to get in. And for nearly four decades, until it closed in 2008, Morris Martick's Restaurant Francais was the best French restaurant in Baltimore. Longtime patrons still dream of his sweet potato soup and bouillabaisse. (Walter McCardell, Baltimore Sun photo)

From 1946 to 1983, Baltimoreans could enjoy their Chinese food in dining rooms with such names as the Longevity Room, Cheat-Chat and Forbidden Quarters. The New China Inn didn't serve its food in little white cartons with wire handles, but there was no better Kung Pao chicken to be found anywhere.
From 1946 to 1983, Baltimoreans could enjoy their Chinese food in dining rooms with such names as the Longevity Room, Cheat-Chat and Forbidden Quarters. The New China Inn didn't serve its food in little white cartons with wire handles, but there was no better Kung Pao chicken to be found anywhere. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

After narrowly beating long-time incumbent Samuel Friedel in the 1970 Democratic primary, Mitchell became the first African-American to represent the state in the U.S. Congress. He remained a member of the House for 16 years and was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus.
After narrowly beating long-time incumbent Samuel Friedel in the 1970 Democratic primary, Mitchell became the first African-American to represent the state in the U.S. Congress. He remained a member of the House for 16 years and was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

See, there's this little horse race at Pimlico every May ... (Pictured: Secretariat at the 1973 Preakness Stakes.)
See, there's this little horse race at Pimlico every May ... (Pictured: Secretariat at the 1973 Preakness Stakes.) (William Mortimer, Baltimore Sun photo)

A stunning example of feminine pulchritude, Starr was a mainstay of Baltimore's infamous Block for decades; she even owned the legendary Two O'Clock Club for years. She quit stripping professionally in 1975, later sold jewelry at a Carroll County mall and is now happily retired at her home in rural Twelve Pole Creek, W.Va.
A stunning example of feminine pulchritude, Starr was a mainstay of Baltimore's infamous Block for decades; she even owned the legendary Two O'Clock Club for years. She quit stripping professionally in 1975, later sold jewelry at a Carroll County mall and is now happily retired at her home in rural Twelve Pole Creek, W.Va. (Baltimore Sun file photo, 1964)

Known officially as the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Cathedral Street house of worship (now you know where the street got its name) was completed in 1821. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect responsible for the U.S. Capitol.
Known officially as the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Cathedral Street house of worship (now you know where the street got its name) was completed in 1821. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect responsible for the U.S. Capitol. (Algerina Perna, Baltimore Sun photo)

The Rheb family has been delighting Baltimore's collective sweet tooth since 1917. They closed their stall at Lexington Market in 2008, but you can still get the city's best sugar rush at their Wilkens Avenue store.
The Rheb family has been delighting Baltimore's collective sweet tooth since 1917. They closed their stall at Lexington Market in 2008, but you can still get the city's best sugar rush at their Wilkens Avenue store. (Amy Davis, Baltimore Sun photo)

Founded in 1827 (its cornerstone was laid the following year by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence), the B&O was long one of the nation's premier railroads. Though the railroad itself has largely disappeared, its legacy remains strong in Baltimore's B&O Railroad Museum, the magnificent B&O Railroad building on Charles Street (now home to the high-class Hotel Monaco) and, let us not forget, a key Monopoly property.
Founded in 1827 (its cornerstone was laid the following year by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence), the B&O was long one of the nation's premier railroads. Though the railroad itself has largely disappeared, its legacy remains strong in Baltimore's B&O Railroad Museum, the magnificent B&O Railroad building on Charles Street (now home to the high-class Hotel Monaco) and, let us not forget, a key Monopoly property. (Hans Marx, Baltimore Sun photo)

Opened by the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad in 1850 (which makes it the oldest surviving big-city passenger station in the U.S.), the station earned its place in history in 1861, when Union troops heading from it to the B&O's Camden Station, were set upon by local Southern sympathizers, resulting in the first bloodshed of the American Civil War.
Opened by the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad in 1850 (which makes it the oldest surviving big-city passenger station in the U.S.), the station earned its place in history in 1861, when Union troops heading from it to the B&O's Camden Station, were set upon by local Southern sympathizers, resulting in the first bloodshed of the American Civil War. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

Long Baltimore's industrial showpiece, Beth Steel employed some 75,000 workers at its Sparrows Point steel mill and Baltimore shipyard, making steel for structures throughout the country and, during World War II, producing scores of Liberty ships for use in the war effort. Now all but abandoned, the fate of the mill and the acres of surrounding property remain uncertain.
Long Baltimore's industrial showpiece, Beth Steel employed some 75,000 workers at its Sparrows Point steel mill and Baltimore shipyard, making steel for structures throughout the country and, during World War II, producing scores of Liberty ships for use in the war effort. Now all but abandoned, the fate of the mill and the acres of surrounding property remain uncertain. (Edward Nolan, Baltimore Sun photo, 1956)

The Jazz Age novelist responsible for "The Great Gatsby" lived in Baltimore while his wife, Zelda, was undergoing psychiatric treatment. He rented a mansion in Towson, and while there wrote his novel "Tender Is the Night." The couple, embodiments of Jazz Age excess, are buried together in a Rockville cemetery.
The Jazz Age novelist responsible for "The Great Gatsby" lived in Baltimore while his wife, Zelda, was undergoing psychiatric treatment. He rented a mansion in Towson, and while there wrote his novel "Tender Is the Night." The couple, embodiments of Jazz Age excess, are buried together in a Rockville cemetery. (Frank A Miller, Baltimore Sun photo)

Opened in 1888, this beautiful Victorian-era greenhouse is one of the showpieces of Baltimore's 745-acre Druid Hill Park, one of the oldest landscaped public parks in the U.S. It is now known officially as the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory & Botanic Gardens (named for our current mayor's father, a long-time state delegate).
Opened in 1888, this beautiful Victorian-era greenhouse is one of the showpieces of Baltimore's 745-acre Druid Hill Park, one of the oldest landscaped public parks in the U.S. It is now known officially as the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory & Botanic Gardens (named for our current mayor's father, a long-time state delegate). (Amy Davis, Baltimore Sun photo)

Erected in 1911, this 289-foot tower was once headquarters for the Emerson Drug Co., manufacturers of the antacid Bromo Seltzer (for decades marketed in blue bottles, which explains why a giant blue bottle sat atop the tower until 1936). Although Bromo Seltzer left Baltimore long ago, the distinctive tower remains (is there a skinnier office building anywhere?), now used as an artists' space. (Pictured: A postcard of the Bromo Seltzer Tower building, postmarked July 23, 1915)
Erected in 1911, this 289-foot tower was once headquarters for the Emerson Drug Co., manufacturers of the antacid Bromo Seltzer (for decades marketed in blue bottles, which explains why a giant blue bottle sat atop the tower until 1936). Although Bromo Seltzer left Baltimore long ago, the distinctive tower remains (is there a skinnier office building anywhere?), now used as an artists' space. (Pictured: A postcard of the Bromo Seltzer Tower building, postmarked July 23, 1915) (Baltimore Sun file photo)

Since 1921, the slogan "Polock Johnny's is my name; Polish sausage is my game" has been a sure sign of good food to be had in Baltimore. It used to be that Polock Johnny's were everywhere: Lexington Market, Towson, Hampden, Greenmount Avenue, Ocean City. Now only two remain, at Security Square Mall and inside Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Still the best Polish sausages anywhere, and ordering one with the works is as close to gustatory heaven as you'd want to get.
Since 1921, the slogan "Polock Johnny's is my name; Polish sausage is my game" has been a sure sign of good food to be had in Baltimore. It used to be that Polock Johnny's were everywhere: Lexington Market, Towson, Hampden, Greenmount Avenue, Ocean City. Now only two remain, at Security Square Mall and inside Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Still the best Polish sausages anywhere, and ordering one with the works is as close to gustatory heaven as you'd want to get. (Joseph DiPaola, Baltimore Sun photo)

Legend has it that duckpin bowling -- smaller balls, smaller pins -- originated in Baltimore, at lanes run by the legendary John McGraw (of Orioles and, later, New York Giants fame). But here are a couple facts: Baltimore remains one of the few places you can bowl duckpins, and nobody was better at it than the legendary Elizabeth "Toots" Barger (pictured, right, with duckpin champ Cliff Kidd Sr.) , the Hamilton native who 12 times won the prestigious Evening Sun tournament.
Legend has it that duckpin bowling -- smaller balls, smaller pins -- originated in Baltimore, at lanes run by the legendary John McGraw (of Orioles and, later, New York Giants fame). But here are a couple facts: Baltimore remains one of the few places you can bowl duckpins, and nobody was better at it than the legendary Elizabeth "Toots" Barger (pictured, right, with duckpin champ Cliff Kidd Sr.) , the Hamilton native who 12 times won the prestigious Evening Sun tournament. (Perry Thorsvik, Baltimore Sun photo)

For nearly 40 years, until it was shuttered for good in 1995, no place in the Baltimore area was more popular with kids than this 52-acre wonderland off Route 40 in Ellicott City. Where else could kids cavort with Old King Cole, the Old Woman in the Shoe and Humpty Dumpty? Much of the Forest's exhibits continue to enchant from the grounds of nearby Clark's Elioak Farm.
For nearly 40 years, until it was shuttered for good in 1995, no place in the Baltimore area was more popular with kids than this 52-acre wonderland off Route 40 in Ellicott City. Where else could kids cavort with Old King Cole, the Old Woman in the Shoe and Humpty Dumpty? Much of the Forest's exhibits continue to enchant from the grounds of nearby Clark's Elioak Farm. (Edwin Remsberg, Baltimore Sun photo)
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