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Neighborhood Spotlight: Homeland

A home on St. Albans Way in Baltimore's Homeland neighborhood.
A home on St. Albans Way in Baltimore's Homeland neighborhood. (Kim Hairston / Baltimore Sun)

Location: Northern Baltimore City, with North Charles Street and Roland Park to the immediate west, Guilford to the south and Rodgers Forge to the north.

Average property listing price: $551,000 from 2013-2014, says Saro Dedeyan, an agent at the Coldwell Banker office in Roland Park. In the last year, properties ranged from $152,000 for a semidetached fixer-upper to $1,050,000 for a 5,188-square-foot home.

Size: The neighborhood consists of approximately 400 acres and 976 homes, according to Dedeyan.

The history: Used as an estate and farm by David Maulden Perine, Baltimore’s register of wills throughout the mid-1800s, Homeland was officially declared a community in 1924 when it was purchased by the Roland Park Co. The Olmsted Brothers, who are noted for their architecturally planned developments, like Roland Park and Guilford, laid out the neighborhood streets and public spaces, accommodating the six existing ponds or “lakes,” as Homeland residents call them, that Perine dug in the 1840s. Emphasis on Tudor, Colonial and Georgian styles is noticeable throughout the neighborhood, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

What’s there: “Other than Guilford, it’s the second neighborhood [north of] downtown where people can have yards,” says Dedeyan, who has lived in three different houses in Homeland throughout the last 16 years.“I love it here.”

He says many of his clients interested in Homeland are millennials and young families, perhaps the result of the neighborhood's proximity to Notre Dame of Maryland University and Loyola University Maryland.

They're also attracted to the history, he says: "People want that unique architecture, and it truly is unique. There's something for everybody."

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Neighborly interaction is valued here, and the Homeland lakes often serve as a gathering place for annual family-friendly events like community picnics, remote control boat races, Halloween contests and outdoor movies.

Why Homeland: Laura Werther, Homeland Association communications chair, moved here from Butchers Hill four years ago. She remembers riding her bike through the neighborhood for the first time when she was a student at the former Loyola College. 

"You think, 'Wow, I'm in Baltimore City right now?'" she says. "It's beautiful, but it's accessible to the city. You get the amenities of being close while living in a quieter residential area."

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