This Week in Black Twitter: Seeing a doping double standard, learning history with memes

Maria Sharapova's doping scandal highlights the perceived double standards Serena Williams faces.

Welcome back to This Week in Black Twitter, your weekly digest of the happenings on Black Twitter and cultural conversations on the Web. Topics will span the gamut — with pop culture, politics, sports, lifestyles and everything in between. This week: Reactions to Maria Sharapova's failed drug test, Nancy Reagan deemed a trap queen and #MemeHistory.

1. Serena Williams doesn’t need to be petty. She can let the Internet do that for her.

On Monday, tennis star Maria Sharapova announced that she failed a drug test at the Australian Open in January, testing positive for meldonium. The substance was banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency at the beginning of the year for performance-enhancement reasons.

At the news conference, Sharapova said she had been taking the drug for medical purposes for 10 years and was not aware of its new status as a banned substance. Still, Sharapova faces a maximum suspension of four years.

Naturally, everyone was eager for a response from Williams, who has beat Sharapova 18 times in a row since 2005.

Some of Sharapova's fans tweeted their support, using #IStandWithMaria and #LetMariaPlay.

But other users wondered what the response would have been if it was Williams who failed the drug test, highlighting the perceived double standards Williams faces.

When Williams did respond, she didn’t do a celebratory dance (at least not in the public eye). Instead, she kept it classy, applauding Sharapova's “courage and heart” for owning up to it.

 

2. Who was the most famous trap queen? Well, according to this petition, it was Nancy Reagan.

More than 7,000 people signed the online petition, which requests that Fetty Wap perform his hit song "Trap Queen" at the funeral of the former first lady who died Sunday.

To refresh your memory, a trap queen is a savvy woman who holds down her man and assists with his drug operations. As the song goes, “She my trap queen, let her hit the bando / We be countin' up, watch how far them bands go.”

"She was married to the money and introduced America to the stove," the petition says, referencing production of crack cocaine.

It then goes on to cite the American drug epidemic that took place under Ronald Reagan's presidency and Nancy's anti-drug campaign.

"While her husband, Ronald Reagan, was linking up with Papi to flood the streets with narcotics, Nancy was on TV telling kids to 'Say No To Drugs.' Her infamous "anti-drug" phrase encouraged strict laws on drug possession that led to a school-to-prison pipeline we're still dealing with now. Blacks and Latinos went to jail in droves for possessing drugs her husband gave them."

Some thought it was a little too soon, especially considering her funeral is today.

But I wonder whether people will start calling the White House the Trap House now?

 

3. @TylerIAm blessed the timeline on Thursday with #MemeHistory, making the case that learning history is fun — with the use of memes and, of course, gifs.  

 Ya'll came through with the Biblical references.

Your history teachers would be extremely proud.

 If Twitter were a class, you’d all get A’s.

mpryce@baltsun.com
twitter.com/megpryce

Copyright © 2018, The Baltimore Sun, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication | Place an Ad
34°