Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright in "House of Cards."
Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright in "House of Cards." (David Giesbrecht / Netflix)

Let's break down Season 5, Episode 2 of "House of Cards."

MAJOR PLOT POINTS

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President Underwood looks to engage in some old-fashioned voter suppression, using the threat of terror to set up voting centers in battleground states, which could hinder his opponent, Will Conway's, path to the White House.

While Congress ramps up its investigation into the Underwoods, Frank looks to close ranks and aims to buy loyalty from those who could testify against him with political favors. Seth, meanwhile, secures himself a life raft, and tries to set up an immunity deal for himself.

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While making a public appearance, Claire learns that an old friend of Frank's has gone missing and is presumed dead. It is heavily implied that Frank had romantic feelings for the man, but because of societal pressures back in the day, he could not act on them.

Tom Yates speaks to the media about his role in the White House, and although he doesn't let on about his romantic involvement with the Underwoods, LeAnn is left uneasy, and warns Frank that Tom could become the latest in a series of scandals plaguing the administration.

Aidan, who is spearheading Frank's domestic spying program, begins feeling the heat from NSA auditors and aims to cover his tracks. He succeeds, but has a close call.

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BEST LINE

"The past doesn't disappear on command, Francis. Not even for presidents." — Claire

MOST EVIL MOMENT

Aidan orchestrates a cyberattack on all electronic communication in the Washington area, which serves multiple purposes: Aidan can cover his tracks; Frank uses the fear generated from the attack to force governors in swing states to comply with his voter suppression tactics; and it bolsters Frank's continued effort to force Congress to formally declare war on ICO.

BIGGEST SHOCKER

The Underwoods have jack-o-lantern art of their own faces in the White House residence.

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