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Casey Wilson's top five movie comedies

When Casey Wilson joined the cast of "Saturday Night Live," she became the first Not Ready For Prime-Time Player who was born in the 1980s. Here's are the movie comedies that meant the most to this member of Generation Y.

"Clue" (1985): How nostalgic — a movie based not on a video game, but on the murder-mystery board game peopled with archetypal characters (Colonel Mustard, Reverend Green, Miss Scarlet) and peppered with old-fashioned weapons (rope, revolver, candlestick). "Oh, I know it's a weird choice, but I saw it when I was little, and it has Madeline Kahn in it [she played Mrs. White]. I always loved her so much. And Eileen Brennan, too [she played Mrs. Peacock]. The two of them are up to so much funny stuff in that movie!"

"When Harry Met Sally" (1989): Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan test whether a man and a woman can remain just good friends. To Wilson, "This is just a perfect movie."

"Soapdish" (1991): A behind-the-scenes parody of soap operas with an ensemble cast including Sally Field, Kevin Kline, Robert Downey Jr. and Whoopi Goldberg. "I love when an actress like Sally Field gets to be funny," says Wilson.

"Death Becomes Her" (1992): Meryl Streep as a youth-obsessed acting diva and Goldie Hawn as her nemesis. "I love when Meryl Streep gets to be funny, too!"

The Complete Mock- Documentaries of Christopher Guest: "Waiting for Guffman" (1997), the story of an ambitious small-town impresario attempting to mount a musical celebration of Blaine, Missouri's 150th anniversary; "Best in Show" (2000), an ensemble portrait of competitors at a prestigious dog show; "A Mighty Wind" (2003), an affectionate satire of a 1960s folk group; "For You Consideration" (2006), the tale of what happens when the cast and crew of a low-budget movie called "Home for Purim" succumb to Oscar buzz.

All these movies feature Wilson's ideal, Catherine O'Hara, as well as Guest himself, Eugene Levy, Fred Willard and Harry Shearer. "But 'Waiting for Guffman' is my favorite of all time, because of the comedy and what's going on behind it."

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