The exterior of the Arch Social Club, one of many buildings offering free access to the public for Doors Open Baltimore Oct. 5-6.
The exterior of the Arch Social Club, one of many buildings offering free access to the public for Doors Open Baltimore Oct. 5-6. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)

Doors Open Baltimore

Ever wonder what some of Baltimore’s coolest buildings look like on the inside? Here’s the perfect chance to find out. Charm City’s architectural showpieces are throwing their doors open, inviting the general public to come on in and marvel. Enjoy access to more than 50 buildings, both new and old, from the 414 Light Street Apartments (built in 2018) to Zion Lutheran Church, 400 E. Lexington St. (built 1807). So many others to choose from, including the fabulous Arch Social Club (1912), 2426 Pennsylvania Ave., with its painted ladies above the doorway; the stately and magnificent George Peabody Library (1878), 17 E. Mount Vernon Place; and the old Eastern Avenue Sewage Pumping Station (1912), 751 Eastern Ave., once site of the Baltimore Public Works Museum and soon to reopen as the Public Works Experience. And best of all, admission to all the sites is free. Most buildings will be open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 5, with select buildings open for guided tours on Oct. 6. Check out doorsopenbaltimore.org for a complete schedule and sites listing.

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The second International Edgar Allan Poe Festival is Oct. 5-6.
The second International Edgar Allan Poe Festival is Oct. 5-6. (Virginian-Pilot file photo)

International Edgar Allan Poe Festival

Two days of all things Poe, including live performances, poetry, vendors and more. Among the highlights: a re-enactment (at the Carroll Mansion, 800 E. Lombard St.) of Poe’s funeral; he died 170 years ago this weekend, on Oct. 7, 1849 ($20); tours of the Poe House, 203 N. Amity St. ($15); and the festive Black Cat Ball, 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Westminster Hall, 519 W. Fayette St. ($125-$200). Festival hours are 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 5-6 outside the Poe House. Free. poefestinternational.com.

Free Fall Baltimore

Charm City’s annual effort to make the arts more-than-affordable for everyone (can’t do much better than free) kicks off Oct. 2 with a concert by the Carl Grubbs Jazz/String Ensemble (7 p.m. at Keystone Korner Baltimore, 1350 Lancaster St.), then continues throughout the month with music, theater, art displays, workshops and more, including “The Play’s the Thing,” teen workshops from the Baltimore Shakespeare Factory (7 p.m. Oct. 4, 11, 18 and 25 at St. Mary’s Community Center, 3900 Roland Ave.); a program of Brahms, Nielsen and Dvořák from the Peabody Symphony Orchestra (7:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at the Miriam A. Friedberg Concert Hall, 1 E. Mount Vernon Place); “Beats & Breaks: Exploring Maryland’s Diverse Music Traditions” (6:30 p.m. Oct. 26 at the Arch Social Club, 2426 Pennsylvania Ave.). Everything’s free, although some require getting tickets or registering in advance. For a full list of what’s where, go to freefallbaltimore.org.

The original "'Ghostbusters" will play the Maryland Science Center's IMAX theater on Oct. 4,
The original "'Ghostbusters" will play the Maryland Science Center's IMAX theater on Oct. 4, (Handout)

‘Ghostbusters’ in IMAX

One of the funniest movies of the ’80s (dare we say “all time”?) comes to the IMAX theater at the Maryland Science Center, 601 Light St. With Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis and Ernie Hudson as sleuths of the supernatural, looking to save Manhattan from demonic possession. And featuring the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man, finally shown life-size. 7 p.m. Oct. 4. $20. mdsci.org.

‘Secret Life of Earth: Alive! Awake! (and possibly really Angry!)'

The American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway, offers as exhibition “that’s one part visual earth love-fest, and two parts environmental crash course on the wonders and interdependent fragility of life on our one, blue, homegirl planet.” Includes paintings, photographs, short films, paper cutouts, even the illustrated journal of Julia Butterfly Hill, who spent more than two years sitting in a giant redwood to prevent its falling victim to commercial logging. Kicks off Oct. 4 with a preview party from 7 p.m.-10 p.m. ($20), then opens to the public Oct. 5, remaining on exhibit until Sept. 6, 2020. Museum hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday. $9.95-$15.95, free for kids 6 and under. avam.org.

The Baltimore Taco Festival is Oct. 5-6 at Power Plant Live.
The Baltimore Taco Festival is Oct. 5-6 at Power Plant Live. (Caitlin Faw / Baltimore Sun)

Baltimore Taco Festival

Ah, the joys of tacos! For two days, more than 30 of our area’s finest restaurants, food trucks and eateries will be serving up 75-plus varieties of tacos (75? the mind reels), plus margaritas, Mexican corn, churritos, churros, tamales, nachos and more. Plus “taco-themed activities,” which can only be great. 2 p.m.-8 p.m. Oct. 5, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Oct. 6 (noon both days for VIPs) at Power Plant Live, 34 Market Place. $9.95-$49.95. tacofests.com/baltimore-taco-festival.

A Harlem Renaissance Speakeasy: Featuring Live Jazz and Poetry From the 1920s

Words and music from Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Duke Ellington and others, performed and recited in 1930s-style (when Prohibition forced good times behind closed doors). Music from the jazz quintet Petra Martin and The Jazz Masters, plus appearances by local poets and musical-theater performers. For nourishment, there’ll be “speakeasy-inspired” hors d’oeuvres and desserts by My Sweets and More, a cash bar and signature cocktails such as The Bees Knees and Sweet Lucille. 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Oct. 5 at the Rouse Company Foundation Student Services Building on the campus of Howard Community College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. $45. howardcc.edu/harlemrenaissance.

Baltimore Japan Art Festival

Japanese pop artist Utomaru is featured at this year’s festival, which includes a Japanese music dance party with DJ Es & Nick Stropko (9 p.m. Oct. 3 at The Crown, 1910 N. Charles St., $5); an opening reception for “Wild Party,” an exhibition of Utomaru’s work (7 p.m.-10 p.m. Oct. 4 at the Maryland Institute College of Art’s Fox Building, 1305 W. Mount Royal Ave., free with RSVP); a conversation with Utomaru, hosted by Baltimore-based illustrator Alex Fine (6 p.m. Oct. 5 at MICA’s Lazarus Center, 131 W. North Ave., $12-$15); and a free screening of the 1999 anime “Adolescence of Utena” (6 p.m. Oct. 6 at The Crown). bjaf.tilda.ws.

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David London hosts "An Evening of Victorian Magic" Oct. 3 at Evergreen Museum & Library.
David London hosts "An Evening of Victorian Magic" Oct. 3 at Evergreen Museum & Library. (Courtesy of David London, Handout)

An Evening of Victorian Magic

Magician and storyteller David London shows how magic took hold of Victorian imaginations. Among his props: an 18th-century magic kit at the Evergreen Museum & Library, 4545 N. Charles St. 7 p.m. Oct. 3 (with a VIP reception at 6 p.m. and a reception “w/Victorian libations” at 6:30 p.m.) at Evergreen’s Bakst Theatre. $25-$45. Tickets through eventbrite.com.

Tails on the Rails

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Dogs and the humans they tolerate are invited to ride the historic rails at the B&O Railroad Museum, 901 W. Pratt St. With a beer and wine happy hour, food trucks and a live DJ (to keep the humans occupied), plus treats and play time (following a train ride to Carroll Park) for the four-footed creatures that really matter. 2 p.m.-6 p.m. (3 p.m. train ride) Oct. 5. $15-$20. borail.org.

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