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Baltimore's famous literary figures and their favorite local...

The horror icon’s former home at 203 Amity St. and burial place at Westminster Hall get the most visitors. But did you know that the saloon where Poe allegedly took his last drink still stands? After leaving The Horse You Came In On at 1626 Thames St. on Oct. 3, 1849, the poet was found a few hours later deliriously wandering the streets, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He died days later, on Oct. 7.
(Colby Ware / For The Baltimore Sun)
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A surprising number of Baltimore’s ghosts have ink-stained fingers. The list of former Charm City literary figures, which includes the likes of Frederick Douglass, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein, reads like a who’s who of American letters. Here you’ll find a list of some of their favorite local “haunts.”
Information for this gallery was gleaned from The Baltimore Sun archives; Maryland Humanities; the Maryland Historical Trust; and from The Baltimore Literary Heritage Project, put together by the University of Baltimore.
(Mary Carole McCauley)
Frederick Douglass home, 524 S. Dallas St.
Though the great orator and intellectual is primarily associated with Washington, he lived for a time in a classic Baltimore rowhouse at 524 S. Dallas St. The home is one of five properties on that block that Douglass constructed as rental properties for African-Americans in the 1890s, according to the Maryland Historical Trust. Now, the home is owned by Gregory Morton, <a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/home-garden/bs-fe-adv-dream-home-frederick-douglass-20170616-story.html">who has decorated the home to reflect its important place in African-American history.</a>
Though the great orator and intellectual is primarily associated with Washington, he lived for a time in a classic Baltimore rowhouse at 524 S. Dallas St. The home is one of five properties on that block that Douglass constructed as rental properties for African-Americans in the 1890s, according to the Maryland Historical Trust. Now, the home is owned by Gregory Morton, who has decorated the home to reflect its important place in African-American history. (Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun)
Emily Post birthplace, 14 E. Chase St.
The author of the definitive guide to etiquette was born at 14 E. Chase St. into a family of wealth and privilege, according to the Maryland Humanities Council. She began to write as a way to support her two children after she divorced her husband and received no alimony.
The author of the definitive guide to etiquette was born at 14 E. Chase St. into a family of wealth and privilege, according to the Maryland Humanities Council. She began to write as a way to support her two children after she divorced her husband and received no alimony. (Ogilvy Public Relations)
Edgar Allan Poe's last drinking spot, The Horse You Came in On
The horror icon’s former home at 203 Amity St. and burial place at Westminster Hall get the most visitors. But did you know that the saloon where Poe allegedly took his last drink still stands? After leaving The Horse You Came In On at 1626 Thames St. on Oct. 3, 1849, the poet was found a few hours later deliriously wandering the streets, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He died days later, on Oct. 7.
The horror icon’s former home at 203 Amity St. and burial place at Westminster Hall get the most visitors. But did you know that the saloon where Poe allegedly took his last drink still stands? After leaving The Horse You Came In On at 1626 Thames St. on Oct. 3, 1849, the poet was found a few hours later deliriously wandering the streets, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He died days later, on Oct. 7. (Colby Ware / For The Baltimore Sun)
Dashiell Hammett's workplace, 1 Calvert Plaza
Often credited for creating the hard-boiled detective story, Hammett spent much of his life in Baltimore. In 1915, at age 21, he joined the Pinkerton Detective Agency, in what then was the Continental Trust Building at 1 S. Calvert St. The building gave its name to one of Hammett’s most enduring characters, The Continental Op, according to baltimoreheritage.org. It’s been speculated that the metal birds on that building may have inspired “The Maltese Falcon.”
Often credited for creating the hard-boiled detective story, Hammett spent much of his life in Baltimore. In 1915, at age 21, he joined the Pinkerton Detective Agency, in what then was the Continental Trust Building at 1 S. Calvert St. The building gave its name to one of Hammett’s most enduring characters, The Continental Op, according to baltimoreheritage.org. It’s been speculated that the metal birds on that building may have inspired “The Maltese Falcon.” (George H. Cook / Baltimore Sun files)
Gertrude Stein home, 2408 Linden Ave.
Stein lived in Baltimore for a relatively brief time in her teens and 20s (first at 2408 Linden Ave., pictured, and later at 215 E. Biddle St.) Though the recently orphaned young woman had a rough time here – experiencing the heartbreak of a failed love affair and battling sexism while studying at Johns Hopkins Medical School  according to baltimoreheritage.org – her time here seems to have been formative. It was Baltimore that Stein identified as her “place of domicile” in her will.
Stein lived in Baltimore for a relatively brief time in her teens and 20s (first at 2408 Linden Ave., pictured, and later at 215 E. Biddle St.) Though the recently orphaned young woman had a rough time here – experiencing the heartbreak of a failed love affair and battling sexism while studying at Johns Hopkins Medical School  according to baltimoreheritage.org – her time here seems to have been formative. It was Baltimore that Stein identified as her “place of domicile” in her will. (Algerina Perna / Baltimore Sun)
Ogden Nash's former home, 4300 Rugby Road
The American master of light verse raised his family in his in-laws’ 7,000 square-foot stone home at 4300 Rugby Rd. in Guilford. Nash once wrote, “I could have loved New York had I not loved Balti-more.” Pictured is the home's library in 2013, <a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/classified/realestate/bs-re-dream-home-fore-20130614-story.html" target="_blank">when it was owned by Bari and Thomas Fore.</a>
The American master of light verse raised his family in his in-laws’ 7,000 square-foot stone home at 4300 Rugby Rd. in Guilford. Nash once wrote, “I could have loved New York had I not loved Balti-more.” Pictured is the home's library in 2013, when it was owned by Bari and Thomas Fore. (Colby Ware / For The Baltimore Sun)
W.E.B Du Bois’ family home, 2302 Montebello Terrace
W.E.B. DuBois spent at least a decade in Baltimore beginning in 1939, according to a 2006 article in The Baltimore Sun. He built a house for his family at 2302 Montebello Terrace and co-founded the NAACP at 4805 Mt. Hope Drive., though he later broke with that organization.
W.E.B. DuBois spent at least a decade in Baltimore beginning in 1939, according to a 2006 article in The Baltimore Sun. He built a house for his family at 2302 Montebello Terrace and co-founded the NAACP at 4805 Mt. Hope Drive., though he later broke with that organization. (The Bettmann Archive / Handout photo)
Anne Tyler, a scene from "The Accidental Tourist" filmed on West Cold Spring Lane
Anne Tyler populates her books in Baltimore neighborhoods from Roland Park to Highlandtown to Hampden. When a 1988 Academy Award-winning movie was made based on Tyler’s “The Accidental Tourist,” the film included many local landmarks. For instance, a storefront in the 400 block of W. Cold Spring Lane, pictured, became the Meow Bow animal hospital where the film’s heroine worked. The site later was home to Video Americain
Anne Tyler populates her books in Baltimore neighborhoods from Roland Park to Highlandtown to Hampden. When a 1988 Academy Award-winning movie was made based on Tyler’s “The Accidental Tourist,” the film included many local landmarks. For instance, a storefront in the 400 block of W. Cold Spring Lane, pictured, became the Meow Bow animal hospital where the film’s heroine worked. The site later was home to Video Americain (Warner Bros. Inc.)
Upton Sinclair, Mount Vernon
The muckraking novelist, whose book "The Jungle" helped lead to the first Food and Drug Act in 1906, grew up in genteel poverty in a four-story brick rowhouse at 417 N. Charles St. (It’s since been demolished.) During winters, he sledded in Mount Vernon Square and spent summer days reading under the trees in Druid Hill Park. Here, he's pictured in Mount Vernon in 1965.
The muckraking novelist, whose book "The Jungle" helped lead to the first Food and Drug Act in 1906, grew up in genteel poverty in a four-story brick rowhouse at 417 N. Charles St. (It’s since been demolished.) During winters, he sledded in Mount Vernon Square and spent summer days reading under the trees in Druid Hill Park. Here, he's pictured in Mount Vernon in 1965. (William L. Klender / Baltimore Sun files)
Adrienne Rich, Roland Park Country School
The National Book Award-winning poet was the daughter of a physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital and grew up on West University Parkway. She attended Roland Country Day School and later wrote, “We were taken to libraries, art museums, lectures ... given extra French or Latin reading. ... In a kind of cognitive dissonance, we knew [faculty members] were ‘old maids' and therefore supposed to be bitter and lonely; yet we saw them vigorously involved with life.’" Rich would have likely been familiar with the building on the campus in this photo — known as the Greenway Cottages — when she attended school in the 1940s.
The National Book Award-winning poet was the daughter of a physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital and grew up on West University Parkway. She attended Roland Country Day School and later wrote, “We were taken to libraries, art museums, lectures ... given extra French or Latin reading. ... In a kind of cognitive dissonance, we knew [faculty members] were ‘old maids' and therefore supposed to be bitter and lonely; yet we saw them vigorously involved with life.’" Rich would have likely been familiar with the building on the campus in this photo — known as the Greenway Cottages — when she attended school in the 1940s. (Baltimore Sun files)
Dorothy Parker's burial site, NAACP national headquarters
The famously acerbic doyenne of the Algonquin Round Table left her estate to a man she’d never met but admired immensely -- the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. After King was assassinated the following year, Parker’s money went instead to the NAACP, according to an article from the Sun archives. Parker’s ashes are buried beneath a memorial garden in the organization’s national headquarters at 4805 Mt. Hope Drive.
The famously acerbic doyenne of the Algonquin Round Table left her estate to a man she’d never met but admired immensely -- the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. After King was assassinated the following year, Parker’s money went instead to the NAACP, according to an article from the Sun archives. Parker’s ashes are buried beneath a memorial garden in the organization’s national headquarters at 4805 Mt. Hope Drive. (Walter McCardell / Baltimore Sun)
Karl Shapiro, Enoch Pratt Free Library
The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet lived in Baltimore for nearly his whole life, spending long hours walking the city from Druid Hill Park to Fort McHenry. According to the Baltimore Literary Heritage project website, Shapiro studied to be a librarian and later dedicated the poem excerpted here to the Enoch Pratt Free Library: “Voltaire would weep for joy Plato would stare. / What is it, easier than a church to enter / Politer than a department store, this center / That like Grand Central leads to everywhere?”
The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet lived in Baltimore for nearly his whole life, spending long hours walking the city from Druid Hill Park to Fort McHenry. According to the Baltimore Literary Heritage project website, Shapiro studied to be a librarian and later dedicated the poem excerpted here to the Enoch Pratt Free Library: “Voltaire would weep for joy Plato would stare. / What is it, easier than a church to enter / Politer than a department store, this center / That like Grand Central leads to everywhere?” (Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun)
Zora Neale Hurston, Morgan Academy
The future novelist arrived in Baltimore in 1916 as a maid working for a traveling musical troupe. But, after an emergency appendectomy at the old Maryland General Hospital in the 800 block of Linden Ave., she remained in Baltimore and lived with her sister. She enrolled at Morgan Academy, which then was the high school branch of Morgan State University, though she had to lie about her age to gain admission, according to the Baltimore Literary Heritage Project.
The future novelist arrived in Baltimore in 1916 as a maid working for a traveling musical troupe. But, after an emergency appendectomy at the old Maryland General Hospital in the 800 block of Linden Ave., she remained in Baltimore and lived with her sister. She enrolled at Morgan Academy, which then was the high school branch of Morgan State University, though she had to lie about her age to gain admission, according to the Baltimore Literary Heritage Project. (Estate of Carl Van Vechten)
John Dos Passos, Peabody Library
John Dos Passos lived at various sites in Roland Park, Mount Washington and Cross Keys. But, he’s most closely associated with the George Peabody Library, 17 E. Mount Vernon Place, where he wrote many of his nearly three dozen books. (He's pictured at the library here.) His preferred walnut desk is still located in the library and identified with a marker.
John Dos Passos lived at various sites in Roland Park, Mount Washington and Cross Keys. But, he’s most closely associated with the George Peabody Library, 17 E. Mount Vernon Place, where he wrote many of his nearly three dozen books. (He's pictured at the library here.) His preferred walnut desk is still located in the library and identified with a marker. (A. Aubrey Bodine / Baltimore Sun files)
H.L. Mencken's former home, 1524 Hollins St.
The Sage of Baltimore lived in the same brick rowhouse at 1524 Hollins St., pictured here in 2001, for virtually his entire life. He once wrote, “It is as much a part of me as my two hands. If I had to leave it, I'd be as certainly crippled as if I had lost a leg.”
The Sage of Baltimore lived in the same brick rowhouse at 1524 Hollins St., pictured here in 2001, for virtually his entire life. He once wrote, “It is as much a part of me as my two hands. If I had to leave it, I'd be as certainly crippled as if I had lost a leg.” (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
Russell Baker's childhood homes, 1429. W. Lombard St. and 374 Marydell Road
The former New York Times columnist and “Masterpiece Theatre” host wrote movingly of his childhood in Baltimore in his Pulitzer Prize-winning memoir, “Growing Up.” During the Great Depression, when Baker’s mother struggled to make ends meet, the family lived at 1429 W. Lombard St. His mother later re-married, and moved with her children and new husband to at 374 Marydell Road, according to the Baltimore Literary Heritage Project.
The former New York Times columnist and “Masterpiece Theatre” host wrote movingly of his childhood in Baltimore in his Pulitzer Prize-winning memoir, “Growing Up.” During the Great Depression, when Baker’s mother struggled to make ends meet, the family lived at 1429 W. Lombard St. His mother later re-married, and moved with her children and new husband to at 374 Marydell Road, according to the Baltimore Literary Heritage Project. (Associated Press)
F. Scott Fitzgerald's home, 1307 Park Ave.
A lot of people know that “Tender is the Night,” the novel the acclaimed author considered his best, was finished when he was living in Towson. After that home went up in flames, the novelist moved to the home in Bolton Hill pictured here, according to baltimoreheritage.org. Fewer readers know that the couple’s daughter, Scottie, attended the Bryn Mawr School or that his wife, Zelda, was treated for schizophrenia at Sheppard Pratt Hospital.
A lot of people know that “Tender is the Night,” the novel the acclaimed author considered his best, was finished when he was living in Towson. After that home went up in flames, the novelist moved to the home in Bolton Hill pictured here, according to baltimoreheritage.org. Fewer readers know that the couple’s daughter, Scottie, attended the Bryn Mawr School or that his wife, Zelda, was treated for schizophrenia at Sheppard Pratt Hospital. (Baltimore Sun files)
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