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Baltimore-based artist Jim Condron receives $30,000 Pollock-Krasner award

"The decorations committee job was the kind of thing Maria did best" (2015), by Jim Condron; <br/>oil, acrylic, spray paint, caulk, rubber, plastic, fur, wood, metal.
"The decorations committee job was the kind of thing Maria did best" (2015), by Jim Condron;
oil, acrylic, spray paint, caulk, rubber, plastic, fur, wood, metal. (Courtesy of the artist)

Jim Condron, the Baltimore-based artist whose work has led in recent years toward a bold abstract style, has received a $30,000 grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation.

Named for celebrated abstract expressionist Jackson Pollock and his wife and fellow abstract painter, Lee Krasner, the foundation was established in 1985 to provide "financial assistance to individual working artists of established ability" with "demonstrable financial need, whether professional, personal or both."

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The New York-born Condron, who earned a graduate degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2004, has been exhibited throughout the Mid-Atlantic and beyond.

In 2009, he was one of the first Maryland artists to be featured by the Thomas Segal Gallery in Baltimore. A 2010 exhibit at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park showcased his Inner Harbor-inspired paintings.

More recently, Condron has created abstract oils and often pieces of whimsically titled assemblage art. In the latter, he combines paint with everyday and discarded objects.

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Future plans include "a large-scale piece dedicated to the magnanimous spirit of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner," Condron said in a statement.

His award adds to the more than 4,100 grants bestowed by the Pollock-Krasner Foundation to artists in 77 countries, representing more than $65 million in support. Inside Philanthropy reports that the foundation's grants to artists "typically range from $5,000 to $30,000." 

Condron's next local exhibit is scheduled for the fall at Loyola University Maryland's Julio Fine Arts Gallery.

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