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Artists picked for Light City 2017's Neighborhood Lights celebration

Light City Baltimore also has installations in neighorhoods such as Hampden. Diana Reichenbach  created an immersive light installation that included community members projects as well as a geodesic dome. (Lloyd Fox, Baltimore Sun video)

The artists who will design installations for the 2017 Neighborhood Lights celebration, designed to spread the energy of spring's Light City festival throughout the city, were announced Wednesday by the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts.

Eight are scheduled -- an increase from this year's five. The artists/teams along with the neighborhoods where their installations will be on display and description provided by BOPA, are:

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Jonathan Taube (Coldstream Homestead Montebello): Taube is an "interdisciplinary sculptor" and architect living in Baltimore. He is a 2010 graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art and was awarded a master's degree in architecture from Tulane University.

April Danielle Lewis/Labbodies (Greater Mondawmin): Lewis is a 2009 graduate of Towson University, where she earned a degree in art and design with a concentration in printmaking. Labbodies is a "performance art laboratory" whose work has been commissioned by the Baltimore Museum of Art, Transmodern Festival, Artscape and the Station North Arts and Entertainment District.

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Maura Dwyer* of Spectrum Studio (Hamilton-Lauraville): Dwyer is an interdisciplinary artist living in Baltimore, "working on ways to contribute to community and awareness-driven art practices."

Isaac Ewart (Hampden): A California native who has spent the past four years living in Baltimore, Ewart specializes in paintings that move -- animations that "focus on the tactile quality of fine art blended with a passion for storytelling."

Laure Drogoul (Little Italy): Drogoul, who won a 2006 Janet and Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize, is an interdisciplinary artist (sculpture, performance and events) whose work seeks to draw the spectator in as a participant. Her work has been exhibited/performed at Tokyo's International House of japan, Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Center for Architecture in New York, as well as the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Malaika Aminata Clements (Sandtown-Winchester): A 2013 graduate of Morgan State University, with a degree in print journalism, Clements uses "the mediums of writing, videography, photography, music, dance and theatre to share stories that are often ignored."

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Wickerham & Lomax (Station North): Baltimore-based Daniel Wickenham and Malcolm Lomax have described their work as "fan boy hissy fits." Much of their art, according to the duo's website, is "based on the accelerated exchange of frivolous information, gossip, and codified language that crystallizes into accessible forms in hopes of giving dignity to that exchange." They won the Sondheim Prize in 2015.

Jose Andres Rosero-Curet (Waverly) Specializing in live video projection, Rosero-Curet has worked with such acts as TT the Artist, Blacksage, Hi$to and Mighty Mark.

The actual projects (which will be funded up to $15,000) and descriptions will be announced in January, according to a BOPA news release.

The Light City festival, which will take place in the Inner Harbor area, and Neighborhood Lights 2017 are set for March 31-April 8. Last year's inaugural Light City drew an estimated 400,000 people to the seven-day event.

Organizers promise the event will not be affected by an ongoing court dispute between BOPA and the Roland Park couple who came up with the idea for the festival. The suit centers on who controls rights to names, designs and intellectual property associated with the festival.

*This story was updated to correctly list the name of artist Maura Dwyer

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