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Baltimore schools show uptick in PARCC test results, but the region’s outer suburbs still score much higher

Results in the PARCC test scores varied wildly around the region, with Baltimore City schools still lagging far behind the suburban districts despite showing signs of improvement.
Results in the PARCC test scores varied wildly around the region, with Baltimore City schools still lagging far behind the suburban districts despite showing signs of improvement. (Chris Walker / Chicago Tribune)

Achievement levels of students in the Baltimore metro region varied widely on the annual statewide tests in math and English, with the outer suburbs generally posting higher scores.

Carroll County was the highest performing district in the region on both the math and the English test in grades three through eight. Still, only 54 percent of students passed the math, down from 2018. English scores rose to a 60 percent pass rate.

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Carroll’s schools didn’t fit the statewide trend. Many of its schools posted better results on the math than the English test.

Students in Howard, Anne Arundel and Harford counties had pass rates better than the statewide average, while Baltimore City and Baltimore County were far below the statewide scores.

Over the five years that the test has been given, educators expected the results to improve more significantly than they did. Despite drops in the past two years, math scores are higher now in Baltimore City and every county in the region than they were during the first year of testing.

The percentage of students passing increased in all counties, except Baltimore County and Harford County where the scores declined since the first year the test was given in 2015.

Howard County came in second in the region for its achievement, coming close to matching results from Carroll.

All the districts in the region saw a decline in math scores with the exception of Baltimore City where scores were flat.

Scores in Baltimore City were the lowest in the region and the state, despite increasing significantly in the past two years in English.

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