The Anne Arundel Board of Education will vote on Thursday to renovate, replace or do nothing for Quarterfield, Rippling Woods and Hillsmere elementary schools based on feasibility studies that recommend replacing the outdated buildings.

The studies were conducted by teams of people from the school system, architectural or engineering firms and the community. The capital budget, adopted in September by the board, also has design and construction for funding requests for the three schools.

Advertisement

All three schools have undergone small renovations or additions but have not gone through major changes since they were built more than 40 years ago, according to the three reports.

Quarterfield

The study on Quarterfield Elementary recommends a facility replacement to “provide a modernized, state-of-the-art facility that meets current educational, code, and technology standards for a SRC of a approximately 585 students,” it states.

The facility is not up to code for systems like energy, mechanical, electrical codes, building codes or accessibility requirements and lacks modern technology. The school does not have an automatic sprinkler system, and the study highly recommends installation.

The elementary school does not meet the school system’s optimal learning environment for the 585 students, according to the study. The school does not support spaces for learning studios, before and after care, separate gym and dining and additional storage. For example, though the classrooms are in good condition with natural lighting, the study recommends more storage. The study also highlights inadequate storage and equipment for the media center.

The replacement option would provide less challenges and more opportunities. For example, separate bus and parent areas, new entrance, required parking, open courtyard and more would be possible. This option would take 30 months and cost about $42 million.

Quarterfield, built in 1968, has not had a major renovation or addition since opening, according to the feasibility study. The school takes up about 26 acres and currently has three temporary classrooms, a multi-purpose room for both the cafeteria and the gym, and two “double loaded corridor classroom wings,” according to the study.

Rippling Woods

Based on the feasibility study for Rippling Woods, the committee recommends the school undergo a replacement.

Replacement could provide a new bus loop, student drop off lane, multi-purpose fields and minimal sound disturbances from airplane traffic. The option would take 30 months and cost about $53 million. Students would have to be split up to two locations during the construction.

The facility is not up to code for systems such as energy, mechanical, electrical codes, building codes or accessibility requirements and lacks modern technology. The building does not meet current energy standards and making it very energy inefficient, according to the study.

The ceilings are in either poor or fair condition. The school does not have an automatic sprinkler system, which the study highly recommends installation.

The school does not meet the school system’s optimal teaching and learning environment for 775 students. It also does not have spaces like learning studios, before or after care, and additional storage.

The committee also discussed the issue of having enough natural light. Majority of the spaces do not have enough natural light and the storage accommodation is inadequate as well, according to the study.

Rippling Woods, built in 1972, has had electrical system upgrades, roof replacement and other renovations though it has not had a significant renovation since opening, according to the feasibility study. The school is about 76 acres and currently has seven temporary classrooms and has a three open plan classroom centered around an open media center. The layout of the current building as an “open plan” has created what the study considers to be “compromises to needed acoustic separation," it stated.

Hillsmere

The committee for Hillsmere recommends the project undergo a replacement behind the current school building so school operations can still happen while under construction.

Advertisement

It would also make way for a larger parking lot, drop off area for parents, a bus lane and a new multi-purpose field. The project would address the needs of the school and also the school district and state requirements. The project would take 30 months and cost about $39 million.

The feasibility team went over six options: do nothing, patch and paint, additions and renovations, replacement in existing field or replacement in the building’s current location.

Hillsmere was built in 1967 and is on about 16 acres. The study states the school had “no significant alterations or additions” to the school though it had minor renovations to rooms like the art classroom, media center and health suite.

The windows are not energy efficient and “have reached the end of their useful life," according to the study. The roof though in fair condition has “significant drainage problems," it states. The classrooms are in good condition but the art room does not meet its standards.

The platform in the gym is not ADA compliant and the wood floor is reported to be in poor condition.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement