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Need a haircut? You might be able to get one

On Tuesday, Gov. Gavin Newsom showed off his newly shorn non-mullet and a new, slightly more permissive stance toward the crowded beaches, parks and trails that Californians probably encountered over the long weekend.

“We are moving forward,” he said, “But let us not forget the most vulnerable among us.”

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While he thanked his children for what he has said was a much-needed haircut, the governor noted that they did not take the precautions the state laid out to allow hair salons and barber shops in 47 counties to reopen.

“Our families will have to read these guidelines as well,” he said.

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The directives are similar to ones in place for other industries: Wear masks, stay distant when possible. Wash your hands frequently. Workers should be screened for symptoms.

The announcement was yet another incremental step toward a fully open California, but it was also one in which Newsom seemed to move closer to handing the reins to county public health officials.

As of Tuesday afternoon, he said, 47 of the state’s 58 counties had filed their “county variance attestations,” to prove that they meet the state’s criteria to reopen more quickly than the rest of the state.

But on Monday, the state officials announced that places of worship across the state could reopen at lower capacity — only with the approval of their county public health department.

And on Tuesday, Newsom said that he’d been talking with leaders in Los Angeles County, by most measures the hardest-hit part of the state, about the possibility of allowing some parts of the county to reopen more quickly than others.

That, however, is still just a possibility.

In more tangible developments for residents of the state’s most populous county, where a stricter stay-at-home order is still in place, Mayor Eric Garcetti announced on Tuesday evening that “lower risk” in-store shopping could resume, many pools could open and houses of worship could avail themselves of the new state guidelines.

In Orange County, Sheriff Don Barnes said his office wouldn’t enforce the state’s rules restricting how many people can attend church services, according to The Orange County Register.

And in Placer County, The Sacramento Bee reported that leaders sent a letter to the governor asking to be allowed to reopen higher-risk businesses like movie theaters, gyms and nail salons, which aren’t included in the hair-cutting guidelines.

In conclusion, if you’re confused about what’s open where, check your county’s website.

And hang tight: Things are changing day by day.

c.2020 The New York Times Company

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