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Where can you watch the Democratic, Republican conventions?

In this combination photo, president Donald Trump, left, speaks at a news conference on Aug. 11, 2020, in Washington and Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Wilmington, Del. on Aug. 13, 2020. The conventions, which will be largely virtual because of the coronavirus, will be Aug. 17-20 for the Democrats and Aug. 24-27 for the Republicans.
In this combination photo, president Donald Trump, left, speaks at a news conference on Aug. 11, 2020, in Washington and Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks in Wilmington, Del. on Aug. 13, 2020. The conventions, which will be largely virtual because of the coronavirus, will be Aug. 17-20 for the Democrats and Aug. 24-27 for the Republicans. (AP)

LOS ANGELES — The Democratic and Republican conventions will lack for crowds but not television coverage.

The standard political gatherings that were to unfold for the Democratic Party, which begins Monday in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and for the GOP in Charlotte, North Carolina, will be largely virtual, constrained by the coronavirus.

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That won’t stop TV scrutiny of the speeches and other activities leading up to Joe Biden’s Democratic Party nomination for president on Thursday, Aug. 20, and the GOP’s renomination of President Donald Trump the following week.

But the coverage will look drastically different. Gone will be the images of packed convention hall floors with news anchors ensconced above them; most are likely to broadcast from their usual New York or Washington bases.

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The Democratic meeting will be virtual, with Biden planning to make his acceptance speech from Wilmington, Delaware. Sen. Kamala Harris, his vice presidential pick, is to speak the day before, Wednesday.

The Republican National Convention takes place take the following week, Aug. 24-27. The party plans to hold its first day in Charlotte for the delegate vote, with details for the full meeting yet to be released.

Broadcast networks ABC, CBS and NBC plan an hour of nightly coverage of the conventions at 10 p.m. EDT.

PBS will report on the Democratic meeting from 8 to 11 p.m. EDT daily, with coverage details for the Republican convention awaiting the release of the party's schedule.

Here’s an overview of cable plans:

CNN

Wolf Blitzer, Jake Tapper, Anderson Cooper, Dana Bash and John King will be among the hosts for the channel’s nightly coverage beginning at 8 p.m. EDT for both conventions.

CNN's commentators for the Democratic meeting include Van Jones, Jennifer Granholm, Andrew Yang, and Scott Jennings. Commentary for the Republican convention will be handled by Rick Santorum, David Urban, Amanda Carpenter and Granholm.

Fox News Channel

For the Democratic meeting, Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum will co-anchor nightly editions of “Democracy 2020” at 10 p.m. EDT. The hour-long program will include Chris Wallace, Brit Hume, Dana Perino and Juan Williams as part of a team of commentators and hosts. Fox News contributors Donna Brazile, Karl Rove and Katie Pavlich also will offer analysis.

Fox has yet to announce its plans for the Republican convention.

MSNBC

Nightly coverage for both conventions will begin at 7 p.m. EDT with Joy Reid’s “The ReidOut” followed by “All In With Chris Hayes.” Reid, Rachel Maddow and Nicolle Wallace will anchor coverage from 9-11 p.m. EDT.

MSNBC correspondents and political reporters will offer analysis and interviews with voters and campaigns in various locations.

What about streaming?

There are more than a dozen ways to watch the entire DNC schedule, including breakout panels, on TV, through smart devices or online.

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The official livestream of the convention will be available at DemConvention.com. The convention will also stream online on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Twitch, Amazon Prime Video and Microsoft Bing and on smart devices such as Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV and Roku TV. You can watch it in the C-Span player above.

For TV viewers, it will be available on AT&T U-verse, DirecTV and Comcast Xfinity.

Who’s speaking when at DNC?

With the convention cut down to just two hours a night, there will be fewer speakers. And instead of live speeches, the convention will rely more heavily on videos to prevent technical glitches, including for the most popular figures. Former First Lady Michelle Obama was recording her speech from the family's vacation home in Martha's Vineyard, according to the New York Times.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who was Biden's final rival for the nomination, will be featured the first night. Former President Bill Clinton will speak Tuesday. Harris' speech is set for Wednesday, as is Sen. Elizabeth Warren's. She is among several of the women considered in Biden's running mate search who are scheduled to give convention speeches. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will also speak the third night, as will gun control advocate Gabrielle Giffords, a former Arizona congresswoman who was critically injured in a mass shooting nearly a decade ago.

The speaker list has already drawn some controversy over who was and wasn't included. Some Democrats have argued the schedule favors moderate Democrats and Republicans over progressives and Latinos. Organizers granted speaking slots to former Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a Republican. And former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg tweeted that he's "honored" to be speaking at the convention, though he's not listed on the official schedule.

Former Housing Secretary Julian Castro was not included _ though other former Democratic presidential candidates were. And progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York has reportedly been granted just one minute.

In addition to its political stars, the convention will feature performances from musicians including Billie Eilish, the Chicks and John Legend.

The official list is subject to change, but here's who is scheduled to address the convention so far:

Monday, Aug. 17: Michelle Obama; Sanders; Sens. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada, Doug Jones of Alabama and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota; Govs. Andrew Cuomo of New York and Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan; Reps. James E. Clyburn of South Carolina, Bennie Thompson of Mississippi and Gwen Moore of Wisconsin; and Kasich.

Tuesday, Aug. 18: Former acting U.S. Atty. Gen. Sally Yates, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York, former Secretary of State John F. Kerry, Ocasio-Cortez, Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester of Delaware, former President Clinton and Biden’s wife, Jill Biden.

Wednesday, Aug. 19: Harris, former President Obama, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of San Francisco, Hillary Clinton, Warren, Giffords, Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers and New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham.

Thursday, Aug. 20: Biden and his family; California Gov. Gavin Newsom; former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg; Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms; Sens. Cory Booker of New Jersey, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, Tammy Duckworth of Illinois and Chris Coons of Delaware; and former presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

Amit John of the Los Angeles Times contributed

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