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Here’s what to know about the stimulus bill and where the $1.9 trillion is going

President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion economic stimulus plan would have far-reaching effects on society as the country tries to turn the corner on a pandemic that has killed more than a half-million people in the United States.

The mammoth bill approved by the Senate on Saturday would provide direct payments to Americans, extend jobless benefits and provide a huge financial infusion to states and local governments as well as to schools to help them reopen. It provides funding for priorities like coronavirus testing and vaccine distribution. And it amounts to an ambitious anti-poverty program, offering significant benefits for low-income people.

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Here is a guide to what is included in the plan, which is scheduled to go before the House for final approval Tuesday and then would head to Biden for his signature.

The bill would give out $1,400 stimulus checks.

Individuals making less than $75,000 and married couples making less than $150,000 would receive direct payments of $1,400 per person. The bill would also provide $1,400 per dependent.

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The payments would gradually decrease above those income levels and disappear entirely above an income cap: $80,000 for individuals and $160,000 for married couples.

Those caps were lowered from the thresholds in the House’s version of the stimulus plan, which set the cutoffs at $100,000 for individuals and $200,000 for married couples.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) celebrates after the passage of President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus bill, on Capitol Hill in Washington, on March 6, 2021.
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) celebrates after the passage of President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus bill, on Capitol Hill in Washington, on March 6, 2021. (Erin Schaff / The New York Times)

The current $300-per-week boost to unemployment benefits would continue.

The bill extends unemployment programs through early September, including the $300-per-week federal supplement provided in the last stimulus plan passed in December.

Biden had proposed bumping up that supplemental benefit to $400 per week, which the House agreed to, but the Senate kept it at $300 weekly.

The Senate bill also includes a provision intended to avert surprise tax bills for people who lost jobs, waiving federal income taxes for the first $10,200 of unemployment benefits received in 2020 for households earning less than $150,000.

The child tax credit would become more generous, among other benefits.

For 2021, the bill would temporarily expand the child tax credit, which is currently worth up to $2,000 per child younger than 17. Under the legislation, the tax credit would be as much as $3,600 for children up to age 5 and as much as $3,000 for children 6 to 17.

The bill would make the full value of the credit available to low-income people who are currently ineligible or receive only a portion. And for the second half of this year, it would have the federal government send advance payments of the credit to Americans in periodic installments, akin to a guaranteed income for families with children.

The legislation would also expand the child and dependent care tax credit for 2021, and it would expand the earned-income tax credit for workers without children for this year as well. Through 2025, it would exempt student loan forgiveness from income taxes.

Money would go to fight the pandemic and to help states, local governments and schools.

The bill would provide funding for vaccine distribution as well as coronavirus testing, contact tracing and genomic sequencing. It would give money to the Federal Emergency Management Agency as well.

It would provide $350 billion for states, local governments, territories and tribal governments, and it contains $130 billion for schools. It also includes funding for colleges and universities, transit agencies, housing aid, child care providers and food assistance.

In addition, the bill contains funding to help businesses, including restaurants and live venues, and it includes a bailout for multiemployer pension plans that are financially troubled.

The Affordable Care Act would get a boost.

The bill would temporarily increase subsidies for people purchasing health insurance through the Affordable Care Act’s marketplaces. It includes billions of dollars for public health programs and veterans’ health care.

It also seeks to help those who have lost jobs keep the health insurance coverage they had through their employer, covering the full cost of premiums through a federal program called COBRA through September.

One thing missing: A minimum wage hike.

As part of the stimulus plan, Biden wanted to raise the federal minimum wage, which is now $7.25 per hour, to $15 per hour.

The stimulus bill passed by the House would increase the wage to $15 per hour by 2025, but the Senate parliamentarian said the provision violated the strict rules that Senate Democrats had to follow to pass the bill through a special process that shielded it from a filibuster and allowed for its approval with only Democratic support. A vote in the Senate on Friday to add the wage increase back to the bill failed.

The Senate bill also dropped funding for a rail project in Silicon Valley in Northern California and a bridge between upstate New York and Canada, two provisions that were included in the House bill and drew criticism from Republicans.

c.2021 The New York Times Company

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