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Why are police blaring coronavirus warnings in my neighborhood?

Due to the coronavirus, Governor Larry Hogan has enacted a Maryland stay-at-home order.

If you happen to wake up to the sound of the police blaring something over their speakers, don’t be immediately worried.

It’s likely the Baltimore police urging you to stay indoors during the new coronavirus pandemic.

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Residents have noticed police cars patrolling through their neighborhoods with a clear message: Stay inside and don’t congregate in groups of more than 10. It’s one of the latest efforts to keep residents safe and informed during Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s stay-at-home order.

While police are advising residents to stay in their homes as much as possible, Hogan has allowed people to exercise outside and engage in activities such as biking or walking a dog, as long as they follow his orders not to gather in groups of more than 10 and keep 6 feet away from others.

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The announcement was created by the Baltimore Police Department and the state’s COVID-19 Joint Information Center “with hopes that we can convince people to adhere to the Governor’s mandate,” a police spokesperson wrote in a statement.

“The Governor of the State of Maryland has issued a stay at home order,” the announcement reads. “Please stay inside of your home unless you need to leave for an essential job or essential reason. Failure to follow the order could result in a $5,000 fine and up to one year in prison. By following this order, you are helping to save lives and stopping the spread of this dangerous and deadly disease. Even if you aren’t showing symptoms, you could still have Coronavirus and accidentally spread it to a relative or neighbor. Being home is being safe. We are all in this together.”

The order, which Hogan said will be enforced, states that Marylanders should leave their house only for essential reasons. Police have been seen in Washington, D.C., spreading similar messages through their speakers.

A 26-year-old Lutherville man was charged for allegedly violating the governor’s executive order. Violation of the stay-at-home order is a misdemeanor that carries a fine of $5,000 and up to a year of imprisonment.

In Charles County, a man was denied bail after throwing two parties in a span of just a few days while disobeying police orders to break up a bonfire.

At least 14 people have been charged with violating the stay-at-home order, including a 19-year-old woman in East Baltimore, who an officer believed was outside a vacant home only to sell drugs, according to the charging documents.

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