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Dorothy B. Krug, T. Rowe Price’s first female vice president and world traveler, dies

Dorothy B. Krug died June 10 at the Broadmead, a retirement community in Cockeysville, due to the coronavirus. She was 99.
Dorothy B. Krug died June 10 at the Broadmead, a retirement community in Cockeysville, due to the coronavirus. She was 99.

The running joke within the family was that if someone offered a trip to Hades, Dorothy B. Krug would be in line to buy the first ticket because that’s how fond she was of traveling. But her wanderlust was more than just an itch to get away from home.

“It was the joke of the family because she loved to travel,” cousin Clark H. Carter said. “And it was always travel that was culturally or educationally oriented. She would never in her wildest dreams go to Las Vegas or the beach or some Caribbean resort. It was always Paris or Prague or some other place that was art or history oriented.”

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Ms. Krug died June 10 at the Broadmead, a retirement community in Cockeysville, due to the coronavirus. She was 99.

Ms. Krug was the only child of Andrew Krug, a teacher, and Elsie Clark Krug, a Methodist missionary and import business owner. The family lived in the 2200 block of St. Paul Street across the street from the downtown campus of Goucher College. “My playground was the Goucher lawn,” Ms. Krug was quoted saying in a college spotlight on alumni.

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Ms. Krug graduated from Friends School in 1937 and then Goucher in 1941. Two years later, she joined a fledgling investment firm called T. Rowe Price as one of five employees on the 29th floor of the Baltimore Trust Building.

“She was a loyal and devoted employee,” Mr. Carter said from his home in Baltimore. “I think in the early years with the business on a shoestring that later on became very successful, those early employees were compensated not by pay, but by ownership in the business. That made her financially independent. So she was certainly happy about that. But she was very devoted to what she did. She really did enjoy it.”

Initially hired as a secretary, Ms. Krug rose through the ranks to become the company’s first female vice president in charge of personnel before retiring in 1976.

“She knew that she had come a long way from being a secretary to being an executive officer, and she was very proud of that,” Mr. Carter said.

Ginny Grauel, an independent caregiver for Ms. Krug from 1991 to 1999, recalled Ms. Krug asking her to participate in an interview before Ms. Krug would hire her.

“Nobody had ever said that to me,” Mrs. Grauel said with a laugh. “She made me nervous. She was asking me all of these formal questions such as how long I had been in the business. Then she questioned what I charged because she didn’t like what I charged and she didn’t like the fact that I charged for gas and mileage. She didn’t know me at that point, but I think the longer we were together, she grew to respect me and me with her. This was the way she lived her life at T. Rowe Price. So we became fast friends and were very fond of each other.”

Ms. Krug never married. (“She was a career woman,” Mr. Carter said.) But she was not lonely as she spent much of her free time traveling around the world to countries such as England, France, the Czech Republic, India, Thailand and China.

Even at an early age, Ms. Krug sought opportunities to immerse herself in culture, education and history.

“We didn’t go to the beach,” Mr. Carter said of his cousins’ trips. “We went to Colonial Williamsburg [in Virginia] or they’d take us to the symphony or they’d take us to a play. That’s a memory that the remaining nieces and I recall very vividly. We were very appreciative of that.”

Mrs. Grauel said when she helped Ms. Krug transition from her home in Baltimore to Broadmead, the pair went through several boxes of brochures, pamphlets and photos Ms. Krug had collected from her visits.

“She went to places that I had never even heard of,” Mrs. Grauel said. “Sometimes I wish my life was like hers.”

Mr. Carter said his cousin often gifted him and his wife with magazines from the British Historic Trust.

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“She would give them to us and say, ‘Here. I’m finished with reading this, but you might like to see it,’” he said. “And she was always encouraging us to like the same sorts of things that she liked.”

Mr. Carter noted that his cousin’s travels contributed to her patronage of organizations such as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Walters Art Museum and the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Ms. Krug’s death caught Mrs. Grauel by surprise.

“I talked to her by Skype about a month ago, and she was so upbeat,” Mrs. Grauel said. “She said, ‘I’ve been thinking about you so much,’ and I said the same to her. I said, ‘I’m going to get in there hopefully soon, and then we’ll see each other.’ Then it was on Wednesday [June 10] that I got a text that she had passed from Louise, her cousin, and my heart just fell. I walked around in a little bit of a daze all day until my husband got home, and then the tears just flowed. I could probably do it right now. I’m just so sorry. I definitely wanted to be there with her at the end.”

Ms. Krug was cremated, and a date for a memorial at Broadmead remains undetermined.

In addition to Mr. Carter, Ms. Krug is survived by cousins Anne Carter Jacobson of Columbia, Mo., Louise Carter Potter of Alexandria, Va., Katherine Carter of France, and Barbara Carter of Peaks Island, Me.

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