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Amazon plans to hire additional 3,000 workers in Maryland to meet demand spike during coronavirus pandemic

Amazon said Thursday that it plans to hire an additional 3,000 people in full- and part-time jobs in Maryland because of the spike in demand during the coronavirus pandemic.

The planned new hires in the state are part of 75,000 additional jobs across the United States that Amazon announced Thursday to keep up with demand as people heed stay-at-home mandates and shop online.

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The online retail giant already has hired 3,300 new workers in Maryland during the outbreak. That initial wave of hiring was part of more than 100,000 new full- and part-time Amazon jobs added nationwide in response to the soaring demand.

Workers are needed to pick, pack and ship customer orders and groceries, and deliver packages from delivery stations. Employees are being hired for fulfillment centers, sorting centers, delivery stations and Whole Foods Markets stores across the state, with facilities in Baltimore and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Cecil and Montgomery counties and Western Maryland.

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New Amazon workers in Maryland have joined an existing workforce of more than 7,000 full-time workers statewide. Amazon operates fulfillment centers at Tradepoint Atlantic in eastern Baltimore County, on Broening Highway in Baltimore and in North East as well as a sorting center and a Prime Now hub.

Candidates can apply at amazon.com/jobsnow. Jobs are available on a rolling basis and fill up quickly. Applicants are encouraged to sign up for text alerts for regular updates. To accommodate for the coronavirus, Amazon is offering virtual new-hire orientation sessions and providing training and information through online and app-based sessions.

Jobs pay a minimum of $17 per hour through the end of April, an increase of $2 an hour during the pandemic. The employer provides masks and other supplies for all employees and drivers and adheres to social distancing in buildings.

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