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Baltimore private school sends three students home who may have had 'indirect contact’ with coronavirus patient

Former Baltimore City Health Commissioner Leana Wen answer questions about the coronavirus.

A private all-girls Jewish school in Baltimore sent three students home early Wednesday because they may have come in contact with someone who tested positive for coronavirus.

In an email sent to parents, Bnos Yisroel school leaders said the three girls had “possible indirect contact” with a person who tested positive for coronavirus in New York. The school, at 6300 Park Heights Ave, said it has contacted the Baltimore City and Maryland health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the local rabbi.

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Baltimore Rabbi Ariel Sadwin said the contact traced back to a Westchester County, New York man who has COVID-19. A woman who drove the infected man in a car tested positive. The girls had been at a gathering in New York where the woman had been.

The health agencies advised the school to send the girls home from the prekindergarten through 12th grade school in the Cross Country neighborhood. Officials said they are in the process of disinfecting the school as a “precautionary” measure.

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School officials said they are following the health agencies’ recommended guidelines and that the girls will not be returning to school until they are cleared by a health department. Until then, they will be closely monitored.

The school said it will remain open and advised parents to keep taking precautions such as proper hand-washing and disinfecting every night. Children who are sick with a fever, cough or other cold symptoms should stay home, the school said.

“As this situation is evolving, we will notify you immediately if anything changes,” the school wrote in the email.

Maryland health officials on Thursday night confirmed the state’s first three cases of coronavirus, the respiratory disease that has sickened about 100,000 across the globe and killed more than 3,000.

Baltimore Sun reporter Liz Bowie contributed to this article.

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