xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Things to do in Baltimore and online Jan. 1-7

Start 2021 off right with a musical performance or two (or three), a gallery exhibit that delves into the Black American experience and a visit to the National Aquarium.

Triple Threat Brass will be performing via livestream on New Year's Day.
Triple Threat Brass will be performing via livestream on New Year's Day.

Jan. 1: Triple Threat Brass live-streamed concert

Tune in for a New Year’s Day live-streamed concert by Triple Threat Brass — a group featuring Jordan Hendrick on alto saxophone, Brandon Midgette on trombone, Cyrus Mackey on trumpet, Lowrider James on tuba and Devron Dennis on drums. Brought to you by An die Musik LIVE, streaming costs $7.

Advertisement

Friday at 7 p.m. andiemusiklive.com

The Terry Koger Quintet will be performing via livestream on Jan. 2.
The Terry Koger Quintet will be performing via livestream on Jan. 2.

Jan. 2: Terry Koger Quintet live-streamed concert

Join the Terry Koger Quintet for a Saturday concert. Koger, who graduated from Morgan State University with a degree in music education, has performed musical therapy in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan area for two decades, playing for thousands of seniors at nursing homes and hospitals. He says he’s been influenced by saxophonists including John Coltrane, Johnny Griffin and Charlie Parker. Streaming costs $10.

Advertisement

Saturday from 7-8:30 p.m. andiemusiklive.com

Baltimore-based singer Kristin Toedtman performs from the Enoch Pratt Free Library Jan. 5.
Baltimore-based singer Kristin Toedtman performs from the Enoch Pratt Free Library Jan. 5.

Jan. 5: Kristen Toedtman at Enoch Pratt Free Library

Kristen Toedtman — a singer and composer based in Baltimore — has sung on the soundtracks of movies including “Frozen,” “Big Hero 6″ and “Minions,” and says she is dedicated to exploring music as a “healing paradigm.” She also directs the Community Chorus of Peabody.

Tuesday from 2-3 p.m. prattlibrary.org

The work of Jules Verne is examined from a Yiddish perspective Jan. 7.
The work of Jules Verne is examined from a Yiddish perspective Jan. 7. (Sherurcij // Wikimedia Commons)

Jan. 7: How Yiddish translations reshaped Jules Verne

Thursday evening explore how Yiddish translations of the 19th century science fiction author’s work reshaped perceptions of the writer — creating a Yiddish “Zhul Vern” that was distinct from, yet similar to, the Parisian Jules Vern. Sponsored by the Jewish Museum of Maryland and the Yiddish Book Center.

Thursday, 7-8 p.m. jewishmuseummd.org

The National Aquarium remain open, with restrictions.
The National Aquarium remain open, with restrictions. (Kim Hairston/The Baltimore Sun)

Ongoing: National Aquarium

Though your visit might look a little different than it did before the pandemic, the Inner Harbor’s National Aquarium is still open. All guests over 2 years old must wear a mask and pass a non-contact temperature check upon entry, as well as maintain social distancing throughout their visit. The facility’s capacity is also limited to 25%.

Monday-Thursday: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 501 E Pratt St. aqua.org

Bria Sterling-Wilson's work can be seen at Baltimore's Full Circle Gallery.
Bria Sterling-Wilson's work can be seen at Baltimore's Full Circle Gallery. (VIVIAN DOERING)

Ongoing: “Issue No. 1″ exhibit at the Full Circle Gallery

In the latest exhibition at Baltimore’s Full Circle Gallery, Bria Sterling-Wilson pieces together torn fabric and clippings from fashion magazines and newspapers to create evocative collages that interrogate race and identity. In a quote on the gallery’s website, Sterling-Wilson says her artwork questions the idealized standards of beauty placed upon women of color while also drawing attention to Black joy and unity.

The exhibition runs online until Jan. 16. fullcirclephotogallery.com.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement