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Wandering Eye: Details of a massive heroin network, the McKeldin Fountain makes The New Yorker, and more

Wandering Eye: Details of a massive heroin network, the McKeldin Fountain makes The New Yorker, and more

Former CP staffer Jeffrey Anderson has a killer piece in Tickle the Wire about a globe-spanning heroin-and-meth organization allegedly managed by Indian "folkloric crime figure" Vijay Anandgiri Goswami, better known as "Vicky" Goswami, the husband of former Bollywood actress Mamta Kulkarni. The group's members, some of whom have been indicted in New York thanks to a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration probe, include Kenyans, Indians, and Pakistanis who, supplied by the world's "number one supplier of white heroin," a person identified only as "the Sultan," allegedly brought narcotics through the Middle East and East Africa, shipping them by the ton to U.S. ports. Anderson's treatment of the case stresses the obstacles U.S. law enforcers face in such border-crossing cases, which can become bogged down by diplomatic and judicial complications involving foreign governments. (Van Smith)

If you're like us, you've been following the McKeldin Fountain's Twitter feed @mckldnfntn. Now, the New Yorker takes note of it and similar feeds that find physical structures "tweeting for their lives." The post, by Alexandra Lang, details the documentation of demolition on social media from "destructoporn," including our own photos of the destruction of the Morris Mechanic A. Theater, and looks at others, such as McKeldin Fountain, which activists hope to save. (Baynard Woods)

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The Players' Tribune, the publishing platform for athletes launched by former New York Yankee Derek Jeter, offered the world's most famous golfer, Tiger Woods, a chance to vent about a sorta strange piece of satire in Golf Digest. Written by legendary golf writer Dan Jenkins, the piece, which made perfectly clear it was a fabricated interview, ribbed the 14-time major champion for firing coaches and agents and his notoriously bad tipping. There were even a few shots at Woods' romantic indiscretions that came to light in 2009. It was pretty harmless, and yet Woods felt the need to tee off—pardon the pun—on Jenkins, saying the writer "faked an interview, which fails as parody, and is really more like a grudge-fueled piece of character assassination." Haha, OK man. And in case the headline "My (Fake) Interview With Tiger" wasn't clear, Woods clarifies the interview subject "wasn't me. It was some jerk he created to pretend he was talking to me." Maybe this piece fails as satire, as Woods asserts, in that it's not particularly funny. But Woods' over-the-top response only makes him look worse. (Brandon Weigel)

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