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Stepping in broken glass

In 2012, we gave Sun columnist and WYPR host Dan Rodricks "Best Stepping In It" for his coverage of pit bulls. We misspelled his name on the certificate we mailed him. It came back, ripped in half, in an envelope addressed to "Evan Seprick" or something like that. I'd met him when I did occasional segments for WYPR, but that made me like Dan a lot more.

It was hard not to think of that when I walked into my dentist's office to have some terribly awful stuff done to my mouth. It was too early for Midday to be on, but there was that voice. Rodricks and I have the same dentist. But his teeth must be better than mine, because by the time my two-and-one-half-hour appointment was done, he was long gone and my mouth felt like it had had a foot in it.

I was reminded of my dental torture when I made my way over to the final show at sophiajacob, which is closing. Much of the show was "hung" on the floor. The newsprint posters from each of their shows were laid out under glass, all close enough together that it was impossible to move across the room without stepping on it. Sometimes the glass cracked. Sometimes it didn't. Steven Riddle, one of the gallerists, whose birthday it also happened to be, pointed to a yellowed poster from one of the early shows. "That's the only one we don't have a duplicate of," he said to the BMA's Doreen Bolger, who confessed that the whole idea of stepping on the work was driving her batty. Everyone else too. Every time there was a particularly loud crack, conversation would stop and everyone would look over. After all, when you hear glass breaking on Franklin Street, it is usually not for art. The sound is super-extra especially intense if you go down into the basement, where you hear it grinding beneath people's shoes as they crunch the glass. That's where the dental-torture session flashbacks kicked in. Riddle said they'd only intended to have the gallery for a year, but there had been more than a year's worth of stuff they wanted to do. "But now it's done," he said. David Armacost, one of the other owners of the gallery, admitted that he was a bit sad. Riddle did say that there would be another gallery moving into the spot in June, run by "an out-of-towner and a way-out-of-towner."

We stopped by Bodega Gallery in the Copycat on Friday to see a collaborative show that featured former CP interns Fallon Chase and Rebekah Kirkman (who is now a freelancer). It will still be up next week, when all of the galleries around Oliver Street in Greenmount West collaborate on Alloverstreet, the art-walky thing where you can see a shit-ton of work in one night. One of the spots, Area 405, is run by Stewart Watson, one of the seven finalists announced last week for the Janet and Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize last week. "I got a text from [Station North Arts and Entertainment District's] Ben Stone congratulating me before I'd even heard from BOPA, and I thought he was kidding!" Watson said of the announcement. "Then I think I threw up a little?though it could have been all the bacon." Watson, who also added that she is now hiring an intern, has also been a tireless advocate for getting a yellow CP box out there on Oliver Street. It's the perfect spot for us, so, Stewart, I hope by next week, we can really say, "Get it Wednesday."

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