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What's up with avant-garde music

• New York's Pet Bottle Ningen makes one of the more gorgeously gnarly rackets around right now. A trio of saxophonist Nonoko Yoshida, guitarist Dave Scanlon, and drummer Dave Miller, the trio can fire off the kind of fillings-rattling noise wrapped around throbbing rhythms that jittered out of no-wave power trio DNA or lay down a groove that moves from swinging to skronking. And now that Chuck Bettis and his often incendiary electronics ideas are part of the group, and with a synth duo of Tom Boram and Matmos' MC Schmidt opening, April 4's show at the Red Room at Normal's Books and Records is the week's best bet to have your ears set on fire.

• Not that the next seven days aren't chock full of potential head-expanding experiences. At the Bun Shop on April 2, Classical Revolution Baltimore and the Evolution Contemporary Music Series team up to premiere local composer Judah Adashi's "my heart comes undone" piece for cello and looping pedal, performed by Lavena Johanson; attendees are invited to bring instruments to take part in performances of Will Redman's graphic scores, and for a 50th anniversary celebration of Terry Riley's "In C." On April 5, the Penthouse Gallery holds a round robin concert featuring Microkingdom guitarist Marc Miller, the lyrical jolts of chamber post-rock ensemble Impatience Machine (featuring CP contributor Michael Shank), the aqueous moods of the electronics duo of Rod Hamilton and Tiffany Seal, Patchwork (the Ohio duo of saxophonist Noa Even and percussionist Stephen Klunk), and vocalist Belinda Lau and violinist Blair Skinner performing works by Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos. And on April 10, Bethany Dinsick-who recently released an imaginative, Jack Smith-esque video for "Turn Me Inside Out," a track from the album she released under her nom de music Sick Din-hits the Crown with the bedroom dream-pop of Which Magic, Yoan Yeti (Allyson Little solo), and Liz Vayda.

• Finally, mark Saturday, April 19 on the calendar. That's the day Andrew Bernstein and Baseball Cap throw a cassette-release show for their new cassettes on Ehse Records at the "Hideous Mansion" (2452 Eutaw Place). Bernstein's The Insane Root features is a rearrangement of the piece he composed for Annex Theater's 2013 Macbeth production, nearly a half hour of creeping, shifting tones and textures that blossom into moments of levitating tension, symphonic hums, haunting landscapes, and cinematic expanse. Baseball Cap, the solo project of local Holy Page Records honcho Christian Filardo, offers a different kind of tense beauty. Titled Idiot's Smile, its seven tracks often start with hesitant sounds creaking to life and slowly build to claustrophobic, as if slowly being submerged into water, not realizing how deep it is until the feet begin to freeze.

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