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The Baltimore Orioles organization, steeped in a rich baseball history, will never be consistent winners with you at the helm.

Dear Peter G. Angelos, majority owner of the Baltimore Orioles,

With all due respect, your abilities as the owner of a major-league baseball club are despicable (Baltimore City Power Rankings, Dec. 11). While it is common knowledge that you are an astute businessman in your profession as an attorney, your handling of the Orioles organization as principal owner are crippling your ball club in its abilities to move forward.

I now refer to you as "the meddling master of baseball mediocrity." While no one expects you to attempt to spend monies the likes of the despised Yankees or Red Sox, your miserly ways now have become an obvious hindrance to the organization. You see, sir, any economics wizard will tell that you have to spend money to make money.

I saw your stellar manager, Buck Showalter, on TV the other day. He is a gem, perhaps the best manager in major-league baseball. While Mr. Showalter is the eternal optimist, I could discern by his body language that he is beginning to lose hope that the Orioles can compete with likes of the Yanks, Red Sox, and Rays.

Soon the shining stars in your operation, both Mr. Showalter and the very capable president of baseball operations, Dan Duquette, will fly the coop. Why? Because you are a hindrance to them in terms of allowing them to do their jobs proficiently. That's because they are very savvy baseball men, and you are not. They need autonomy to do their jobs to the best of their abilities, and I'm afraid that will just not happen under your watch. And then there's the spending issue.

In summary, it is my belief that the Baltimore Orioles organization, steeped in a rich baseball history, will never be consistent winners with you at the helm. I say to you without a lick of sarcasm, please sell the team. It's the only way for the organization to prosper once again. Of that I am convinced. While your modus operandi is stellar in the courtroom, it is an utter embarrassment at the ballpark.

As the late, great Charley Eckman used to blather, "It's a simple ballgame."

Good day, sir.

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Patrick Lynch

Nottingham

Correction: The story "The Nature of Things" (Art, Dec. 11) was mistakenly attributed to Baynard Woods. The piece was actually written by Rebecca Scott Lord. City Paper regrets the error.

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