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Diner, New Year's Eve, Senior Cut Day, The Sitter, Tin Men, and The Wild Child

DINER

Barry Levinson’s hallowed portrait of Baltimore and its “diner guys” on the cusp of the 1960s remains just about perfect. It screens for two nights this week as part of the Maryland Film Festival’s 30th-anniversary celebration of the film.

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NEW YEAR'S EVE

Director Garry Marshall returns with a romcom built around several intertwined celebratory (or not) New Year’s stories, featuring Michelle Pfeiffer, Zac Efron, Robert De Niro, Halle Berry, Cary Elwes, Alyssa Milano, Jessica Biel, Common, Seth Meyers, Jonathan Winters, and Charo. OK, just kidding about Jonathan Winters and Charo.

Opens Dec. 10.

SENIOR CUT DAY

Local filmmaker Alvin Gray (

Sweet Dreams

) returns with the premiere of his horror film about high school students finding trouble in the woods.

THE SITTER

Jonah Hill hits one last crass comedy on his way to Respectable Actor Land as more or less the same guy from

Get Him to the Greek

, but this time he’s looking after actual children.

Your Highness

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’ David Gordon Green directs.

Opens Dec. 9.

TIN MEN

Barry Levinson’s comedy about two Baltimore aluminum-siding salesmen (Richard Dreyfuss and Danny DeVito, both spouting fine Bawlmerese) at war with each other still impresses, not least because of a deft subplot involving DeVito’s character’s wife (Barbara Hershey).

THE WILD CHILD

Francois Truffaut’s short and sweet take on a true story goes back to 1798. In the French countryside, some hunters bring an abandoned 10-year-old boy back from the woods. He is silent, fierce, and has had no contact with humanity since the age of 3. Truffaut himself plays Dr. Itard, the sole person who steps forward to take the child under his wing. The boy, named Victor (Jean-Pierre Cargol), is promptly cleaned up and emerges from his haircut looking like a tiny Adam Green. Throughout the film, Itard slowly teaches his young charge how to speak and interact with other human beings. Ultimately, the film lacks any real conflict, but if you’ve ever wanted to see Truffaut in a series of heartwarming montages, you’ll be sure to get your fill. (Erin Gleeson)

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