ATTACK THE BLOCK

Aliens invade a South London neighborhood in this buzzed-about action comedy.

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BLACK SWAN

Darren Aronofsky’s overheated ballet/body-horror/psychosexual thriller certainly isn’t dull.

p.m.

CINEMA PARADISO

If you can avoid getting teary during the closing montage of Giuseppe Tornatore’s love letter to the movies (the traditional season closer at the Little Italy Film Festival) you’re made of stronger stuff than we are.

COLOMBIANA

Zoe Saldana stars in this South American drug-war revenge flick from co-writer/producer Luc Besson.

Opens Aug. 26.

THE DEBT

This decade-spanning thriller involving Israeli agents and fugitive Nazis stars Helen Mirren, Ciarán Hinds, Tom Wilkinson, Jessica Chastain, and Sam Worthington.

E.T.: THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL

Another look at Steven Spielberg’s biggest hit allows one to observe with greater clarity that the film is a relentlessly unified vision of and advocate for a pathological regression to a permanent preadolescent state. For those who have been in a pop-culture coma for decades,

E.T.

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is about an innocent extra-terrestrial who gets lost in a forest located near a suburban womb-world shot mostly from a child-level POV. There we meet Mary (Dee Wallace), who, in a glancing nod to veracity, is divorced with children. Her younger, culturally unsullied son Elliott (Henry Thomas) establishes a telepathic bond with E.T., while little sister Gertie (Drew Barrymore) cutely caterwauls in the background. E.T. falls ill and a group of bumbling scientists temporarily “kills” him, but death turns out to be reversible as Elliott’s love revives E.T. Spielberg’s failure to commit to the dark stuff denudes

E.T.

of the high stakes needed to make it more than emptily affirming fluff. (Ian Grey)

THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH

Then mega rock star David Bowie plays the titular extra-terrestrial in director Nicolas Roeg’s 1976 instant cult classic, but how about a hand for Candy Clark? As the small-town waitress who takes up with Bowie’s alienated alien as he attempts to raise money to save his doomed home planet, Clark brings earthy, toothy energy to every scene she’s in. She’s also pretty much the only reason Earth doesn’t seem like a horrific, soul-destroying place by the time Roeg’s through with Bowie’s character, who, though rich and powerful, succumbs to the human vices of booze, TV, and ennui. Other than the costumes and the tech, this hasn’t dated a jot. (Lee Gardner)

THE PINK PANTHER

The original 1963 Blake Edwards caper comedy that introduced the bumbling Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers).

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