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Mitchell Raised the Most Money in the 44th District Delegates Race

Former City Councilman and 2007 mayoral candidate Keiffer Mitchell so far has raised more than $35,000 to fund his effort to unseat an incumbent delegate in Baltimore's 44th Legislative District, according to campaign finance records. That's the most of

. But Mitchell has also spent about half of that amount, leaving him with the second-most money in the bank behind two-term incumbent Keith Haynes, who has nearly $29,000 on hand. The biggest spender so far has been one-term incumbent Melvin Stukes, also a former Baltimore City councilman. He's spent nearly $20,000 and raised about $12,500--$4,500 of which came in on one day, Aug. 3, from three Baltimore-based towing companies: Frankford Towing, Mel's Towing and Service Center, and Ted's Towing Services. These are significant not only because the three donations comprise such a large amount of his total take, but because Stukes' main accomplishment during his four legislative sessions has been to establish a state task force to study towing practices. Haynes raised $13,625 this reporting period. Most of it--$10,650--came from selling tickets to a fundraiser. And much of that--$3,000--came from Armand, Victoria, and Alexandra Volta of Catonsville. Armand Volta is a personal injury lawyer with the Law Offices of Peter G. Angelos, where Haynes also works. Ruth Kirk, who's been a 44th District delegate since 1983, raised $4,675, the bulk of it from two sources: $2,500 from the Maryland Insurance Council PAC and $1,000 from SEIU DC/MD State Council No. 54 PAC. Billy Taylor hasn't raised much money--a total of $3,445--but it comes from a high-profile list of local donors, including former Congressman Kweisi Mfume, former mayor Kurt Schmoke, former Housing commissioner Dan Henson, former state's attorney Stu Simms, and law professor (and long-time political guru) Larry Gibson. Taylor's largest single donation, $1,000, came from Henry Baines of Stop Shop Save Food Markets. Three other candidates in the Democratic primary--Chris Blake, Gary English, and Arlene Fisher--have little money to work with, though there is still time for them to raise and spend money before the Sept. 14 primary.

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