xml:space="preserve">

| Image by CP Newz Graphic

A Nov. 16 letter from Baltimore City Circuit Court Clerk Frank Conaway had City Hall a-twitter this week, wondering who would, in fact, do the honor of swearing-in Sheila Dixon as mayor at her Dec. 4 inauguration. The faxed letter, addressed to Dixon's Deputy Chief of Staff Beatrice Tripps but distributed far and wide, was classic Conaway: "In today's conversation with my administrative assistant, who called Mayor Dixon in order to finalize arrangements for me to administer the oath of office, you stated that Governor O'Malley will swear in the Mayor. I am surprised that the Mayor's office is not aware that, by law, the Clerk of the Court is responsible for carrying out this task. "However, a provision in State Government 16-105 would allow a sworn deputy of the clerk to administer the oath. Should Governor O'Malley wish to undertake this task, I suggest that you have him contact me with a request to be deputized in this manner. "I assure you, upon receipt, I will give such request my full attention." Conaway, of course, challenged O'Malley as mayor and ran against Dixon, too, though he dropped out of the race a few days before the primary election and threw his support to City Councilman Keiffer Mitchell (D-11th District), who lost by 34,000 votes. One expects that Conaway would be amused by the prospect of the governor coming to him to be "deputized." But he's not heard back from the mayor's office or from O'Malley's people, he says. So what happens now? "What happens is I swear the mayor in, which is one of my duties," Conaway says on the afternoon of Nov. 20. "No one has said anything different to me." A call to the mayor's office brought no response (perhaps unsurprisingly, given

there), a spokeswoman for Gov. O'Malley said that the governor would be present at the inaugural, but did not know whether he planned to swear-in Dixon. The spokeswoman said she would find out and call back, but did not.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement