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Our friends at Calculated Risk have posted an FDIC chart detailing all the alphabet-soup programs and all the money pledged to prop up the financial Ponzi scheme. The total is just shy of $14 trillion.

The FDIC report it's based on is linked in CR's post. (It's 52 pages and it crashed my machine-apparently I've got to update my Acrobat Reader.) What's crazy about this thing is that there are programs we've hardly even heard of, such as the "Money Market Investor Funding Facility (MMIFF)," which has $600 billion in store for investors (and was supposed to end in April). It was made up by J.P. Morgan last October. This was one of the funds set up to bolster the then-failing commercial paper market-the link between businesses that need to borrow money on a short-term basis (to make payroll and such) and investors who want a low-risk, easily gotten-out-of investment.

There were two other programs rolled out last October that were aimed at easing the liquidity crunch in commercial paper. One was called the Asset-backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (or AMLF, for short). That one was funded with a mere $24 billion. The other notable program was called the Commercial Paper Funding Facility (CPFF). That one covers $1.8 trillion-or nearly three times the much-discussed TARP.

The idea of $13.9 trillion is impossible to visualize. If you staked it in hundreds, the pile would be about 11,000 miles tall. OK, so maybe that doesn't help grasp it. Considered another way, $13.9 trillion is more than $46,300 for every man, woman, and child in the United States.

Perhaps coincidentally, the amount of the bailout is also the amount of the U.S. gross domestic product-the total value of all goods and services produced last year. It's also about three trillion bucks more than the current national debt. But we know that will be changing very soon.


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