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Michael Anft's

about the impending demolition of Flag House Courts, the last of the city's public-housing high-rises, examines a city program that critics dubbed "a deliberate effort to reduce the density of poverty by reducing the number of housing units for the poor."

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In Mobtown Beat, Molly Rath anticipates that Laura Weeldreyer's arrival as the head of the

will raise the public-schools program's profile. The Nose covers the auction of picked-over remnants of the collection of curios that had graced the walls of

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, the shuttered Highlandtown restaurant.

Tom Chalkley, in Charmed Life, celebrates the Christmas-light rival to Hampden's "Miracle on 34th Street": the 1700 block of

near Clifton Park.

In the columns, Joe MacLeod's Mr. Wrong does a

, the way only Mr. Wrong can, which is in a mathematically challenged way. Wiley Hall III's Urban Rhythms harps on black public officials getting accused of

the way only Urban Rhythms can, which is to call it a witch hunt. And Tom Scocca's 8 Upper excoriates the Orioles management for improving the team the way only Orioles management can, which is

.

This week's book reviews are: Eric Allen Hatch on two new titles about

; James D. Dilts on Daniel Mark Epstein's

; Andy Markowitz on Lynda Barry's second novel,

; Mahinder Kingra on Jonathan Lethem's

; and Karen Nitkin on Joan Williams'

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, which proposes workplace reforms to help working mothers.

Art is Mike Giuliano on an

of works by Leopold, Richard, and Robert Seyffert, three generations of painters whose work spanned much of the 20th Century.

Bones is Katy Gall's poem,

Zine Pool is Anna Ditkoff hating on Joshua Saitz'

.

In Music, Geoffrey Himes jams out on a new 5-CD release of live

, while Daniel Piotrowski showcases a new Baltimore label,

.

In Film, Ian Grey isn't fond of

or

; Luisa F. Ribiero likes

and

, but finds

a bit thin; Jack Purdy thinks

and

fall short, but likes

; Joe MacLeod is surprised to find himself liking

; and Heather Joslyn is goo-goo-eyed about

.

In Belly Up, Susan Fradkin hits the suburban

, and likes J.J.'s Everyday Café and the Garden Spot Café.

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