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O’Malley campaigns to the cops and judges

O’Malley campaigns to the cops and judges

The

is the best free lunch you can get on a Wednesday afternoon. Every second Wednesday of the month (except August), an array of prosecutors, city officials, and brass from the police department, jail, and prison systems get together to talk past each other under PowerPoint slides. The cookies are always good. Yesterday Governor Martin O'Malley interrupted a talk by Dr. Daniel Webster, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy Research and an advocate of the

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.  Webster was working through voluminous peer-reviewed evidence that all current models of policing the streets—with their concentrations on gangs, drug dealers, "hot spots" and community policing, all of them—"had no effect on violent crime." "We found exactly the opposite of that," the governor piped up from his seat near the middle of the enormous conference table in Room 510 at Courthouse East. The Governor insisted that in Baltimore City, serious crime was much reduced as a direct result of rolling up drug corners. "So Baltimore might be an interesting case study." It was prelude to O'Malley's own 16-slide show, the data in which he prefaced by saying the media would ignore. "Between 2003 and 2009 we achieved the greatest reduction in violent crime in America," the governor said, flashing up his first slide, which depicted state-wide Part 1 crime rates and featured the words "Lowest ever reported" (pictured). "You'll never see this in the

Baltimore Sun

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," O'Malley said. "You'll never see this as a headline in the

City Paper

. But we did it." Other talking points you can expect to hear in the

campaign:

  • We achieved some of the lowest crime rates ever reported since the UCRs [Uniform Crime Reports] were put into place.
  • There are fewer people incarcerated in Maryland now than there were seven years ago.

O'Malley has always insisted that the statistics produced by the Baltimore Police Department during his time as mayor (and beyond) were generally accurate, and that contrary claims by crime victims that police officers were downgrading the severity of incidents or not filing a report at all were very much overblown. (This despite evidence that the CompStat model O'Malley (and his brother, Peter) copied in New York led to

). But there was one statistic O'Malley noted had "unfortunately" increased statewide since 2011: forcible rape. This could be in part because the Baltimore City Police Department systematically underreported rapes until the

Sun

's Justin Fenton

, sparking reforms.  Those higher rape figures are not "unfortunate." They are much closer to the truth. O'Malley's interest in criminal justice is long-standing and serious. He's sent the city money to get warrants served faster, and deploys the State Police regularly during major events (he twice mentioned the Baltimore Grand Prix) to make sure as few people as possible are mugged, beaten, shot, etc. while visiting Charm City. But he

Too bad it's so hard to have faith in his statistics. In the rape cases, the "unfortunate" figures were the earlier ones—the ones that hid the pain and rage of hundreds of victims and allowed rapists to remain on Baltimore's streets.

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