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Baltimore City Paper

Police Sweep Broom Factory

[caption id="attachment_18832" align="alignleft" width="300"]

Photo by Noah Scialom[/caption]

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People who were at the Scapescape afterparty at the Broom Factory Saturday night say the Baltimore Police came in hard, with "tasers clicking" and lots of attitude for the 30 or so people who had by then gathered. They arrested Andrew Gaddis (pictured), an organizer of the party and a leaseholder at the space, a haunt for artists and musicians at 2800 Sisson Street since late last year.

Unrelated to the Broom Factory office building in Canton, The Broom Factory Factory,  as its also known, is a warehouse in an industrial area whose Facebook page bills it as a "DIY arts space, recording studio, venue and whatever else . . ." It's not zoned or permitted as a venue or club, so the events that have occurred there—featuring DJs, rappers, and other musicians often in a deliberately cross-racial setting—are not, strictly speaking, "legal." Police broke up a July 1 show and apparently did not file a report about it. ("Broom Factory Raid Prompts Questions," Mobtown Beat, July 10). Emails to police about the latest action brought no response for two days. Gaddis was charged with disorderly conduct and keeping disorderly house. It is his first brush with the law in Maryland. He is better known as an Open Society Institute grant recipient and co-founder of the Charm City Clinic, a McEldery Park-based non-profit operated by Hopkins students that connects people to medical services. "I think we want to make it extremely clear that the more valuable work that we're doing is trying to form a lasting relationship with someone, where we get to the root of their health issues and provide them with a long-term care solution," Gaddis told the website bmoremedia.com in 2011. "Not just taking someone's blood pressure, providing a medical service, and that's it. I think that's what sets us apart from most other established clinics and health care non-profits." Gaddis kept his Broom Factory Factory involvement separate from his medical work, not mentioning it on his Facebook page and going by the alias "Andrew Glorious" when dealing with Broom Factory matters. In a Monday email to City Paper, Gaddis says:

Gaddis is scheduled for trial on September 19 in District Court on East North Avenue. Others at the event used words like "jackboot" to describe the police officers' actions. Noah Scialom (a contributing photographer for

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) says he arrived at the Broom Factory Factory about 1:35 a.m.  and spoke to off-duty police officers that the party organizers had hired to keep the party safe.  "I set them up at the top of the hill with instructions to not let any cars in, check that everyone was 21+ and to come get myself or Andrew if anything was needed," Scialom writes in an email. Minutes later he sees Gaddis hurry past and, knowing something was wrong, went outside to talk to the hired police. Those cops told Scialom there was nothing they could do: "there are ranking officers there and they seem to be on a mission." Many uniformed city police then marched down the hill "yelling and threatening people with arrest, tasers clicking," Scialom says. "This black lady officer whom I asked what was happening to screams at me to CALM DOWN AND GET AWAY FROM ME. DO NOT STAND BEHIND ME." The pleasantries continued in that manner as police cleared the building and Gaddis came out in handcuffs. Scialom says he asked a Sergeant why Gaddis was being arrested and was told "that it was because Andrew had 'lied to him' and that we needed permits, and Officer G. M. Sullivan began to threaten to arrest me if I didn't move, for Disobeying a Lawful Order. I asked him what the lawful order was, he said that it was to get out of his face."


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