Baltimore City's six state senators and 18 state delegates to the Maryland General Assembly, all of them Democrats, delivered a strong voting record on green bills in the 2012 session in Annapolis, according to the Maryland League of Conservation Voters (MDLCV) annual scorecard that assesses legislators' environmental records. Four of the six Baltimore City senators scored 100 percent this year, as did 13 of the 18 delegates. The city senators' 93-percent average blew away Senate Democrats overall score by 12 percentage points, while city delegates bested House Democrats overall score of 92 percent by 3 points. The only delegates to score less than 90 percent were: Frank Conaway Jr. (40th District), with 60 percent; Jill Carter (41st District), with 80 percent; and Nathaniel Oaks (41st District), with 83 percent. Three city legislators – delegates Mary Washington (43rd District), Keiffer Mitchell (44th District), and Luke Clippinger (46th District), all of whom were elected in 2010 – have 100-percent lifetime averages. The lowest lifetime averages among city legislators belong to 44th District Del. Hattie Harrison (66 percent), 46th District Del. Brian McHale (76 percent), 40th District Sen. Catherine Pugh (78 percent), and 45th District Sen. Nathaniel McFadden (75 percent). At the July 10 press conference at Federal Hill Park, when the scorecard's results were announced, MDLCV executive director Karla Raettig said the 2012 session included both "bold steps forward" and "missed opportunities." Overall, in MDLCV's accounting of votes cast on issues from storm-water management and banning arsenic in poultry feed to offshore wind energy and family-farm preservation, most of the city's legislators were overwhelmingly supportive.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement