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Starting in 1993, DJ Diamond K was producing club tracks for Frank Ski--the onetime local radio personality who first raised Baltimore club's national profile with hits like "Doo Doo Brown"--as well as the late, great transgendered Baltimore club performer Miss Tony. A few years later, Diamond K started his own label, High Rolla Records, as well as the group Da Horsemen, in which he raps as well as produces. One of the group's original members, Say What, has since gone onto his own successful solo career as a club producer, carrying on the group's name with his own Horsemen Entertainment. "That's kinda like his spinoff of it, but everybody is family," Diamond K says over the phone. Diamond K's current project,

High Rolla Records Compilation

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, available at local Downtown Locker Room stores, doesn't focus exclusively on club music, slingshotting between club, R&B, and hip-hop from track to track. And while Diamond K hasn't had a steady gig spinning club since Hammerjacks closed last year, he's still regularly churning out a number of mix CDs for his label. And as High Rolla delves into movies with the DVD comedy

Reloaded

, Diamond K is also prepping a documentary that aims to tell the story of Baltimore club. "I wanna define what club music is, and I'm gonna talk to the early pioneers," he says about

Club Music Is The Future

, due out in June. "We're gonna chronicle the big hits, the impact, it's gonna be an in-depth look at it. It's gonna have a soundtrack with it that's gonna have a mix of basically old to new." One of K's many other projects at the moment is an online music store selling both CDs and mp3s. Baltimore club was, in its early years, released almost exclusively on vinyl, its audience comprised mainly of DJs; in the mid- to late-'90s, the more consumer-friendly mix CD became the format of choice. But in the past few years, as the internet helped the genre find an audience outside Baltimore, club music mp3s spread through blogs and peer-to-peer downloading networks. It might be easy to label out of town B-more club downloaders as bootleggers and freeloaders, much like the RIAA probably would. But if they can't find the stuff in their local stores or on iTunes--which even now only features a handful of club music releases by Rod Lee and Aaron Lacrate--who can blame them? In the past year, though, several local DJs and labels have rushed to fill the void with legit, web-friendly club music distribution. Given that even some of club music's founding fathers are now DJing digitally--

, and DJ Technics has put his own library up for sale--the demand is higher than ever for mp3s of full songs ready for DJs. And many of these vendors, accustomed to charging whatever they wanted for a 12-inch vinyl EP in the days when only a handful of local stores stocked club music, aren't settling for the piddling iTunes rate of a mere $.99 a song, either. Here's a helpful guide to six different places you can buy club music on the web, to help you decide where to fire up your PayPal account and stock your digital DJ crate:

Price:

$3.49 per song

Selection:

70 individual tracks available--or a collection of over 300 songs bundled together for $325--by DJ Technics, Dukeyman, KW Griff, DJ Boobie, and DJ Booman.

Pros:

DJ Technics has created arguably the single best Baltimore club site on the web, with a streaming radio station, a detailed history of the genre, and a multi-format music store that includes insightful descriptions of each available track. The store just went online this week, and Technics is still adding songs, so there'll probably be even more by the time you read this.

Cons:

BCT's store also offers some of the steepest rates for individual songs.

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Price:

$1.99 per song

Selection:

57 tracks by Scottie B., Rod Lee, KW Griff, DJ Class, Doo Dew Kidz, Blaq Starr, and others.

Pros:

Unruly Records, undoubtedly the most important club music label, has the widest range of any of these mp3 stores, for a reasonable price.

Cons:

The site could use more frequent updates of new tracks, considering that the label is constantly putting new vinyl and CD releases on store shelves.

Price:

$3 per song, or bundled together as EPs or mixes ranging from $9.99 to $13.99.

Selection:

34 tracks by Doo Dew Kidz, DJ Booman, and Jimmy Jones.

Pros:

The Doo Dew Kidz's recently re-launched web site has actually responded to constructive feedback, lowering and adjusting its prices since its original offerings, and it includes a rotating selection of free downloads on the page.

Cons:

The site's catalog only includes music by members of the Doo Dew Kidz, although if you only get club music from one DJ, you could do a lot worse than Booman.

Price:

$.99 per song

Selection:

22 tracks--and three ringtones--by Diamond K, Da Horsemen, Miss Tony, Frank Ski, and others.

Pros:

Out of all these stores, Diamond K's is the only one that actually prices its downloads to compete with iTunes.

Cons:

It also has the smallest assortment of product.

Price:

$2.99 per song, or bundled together as EPs ranging from $10.99 to $12.99

Selection:

33 tracks by Rod Lee.

Pros:

Rod Lee is one of the genre's most popular producers, and any club DJ could use an EP or two of his latest jams.

Cons:

So far the store only offers tracks from Lee's new album

The Producer

, and could stand to add some of the dozens of club classics from his back catalog.

Price:

$3.99 per song, and $2.99 per breakbeat loop.

Selection:

30 tracks by DJ Excel, DJ Koolbreez, Two Whyte Kidz, and others.

Pros:

DJ Excel's site streams audio of many of the tracks on sale, including his dynamite collaboration with Bossman, "Push Ya Top Back," and sells a handful of tracks containing classic Baltimore breakbeats for aspiring producers.

Cons:

Bmore Original also boasts the highest price tag per mp3, and little music by the club scene's biggest names.

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