xml:space="preserve">

[caption id="attachment_11954" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Grayling Williams (left) and John King. Should've brought a better camera, I know."][/caption] Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III introduced three key staff members Friday morning during a one-hour round table discussion with reporters. Major Margaret Barialaro will be leading the department's efforts to become accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies, known as CALEA. Grayling Williams, a 22-year veteran of the Drug Enforcement Administration, has taken over the department's Internal Affairs Division. And John King, a 26-year veteran of the Montgomery County Police and former chief of the Gaithersburg Police, is the new civilian head of training. "Internal Affairs basically sets the tone for policy and procedure," Williams said. "I can count the number of cops on one hand that I know and socialize with." The previous director of Internal Affairs, which controls the mostlysecret police disciplinary system—resigned last year after photos surfaced of him and another officer who had been arrested for dealing heroin while in uniform. "Baltimore is a big city department with big city issues," Williams, who grew up in New York City, said. "But they're not insurmountable." King defended the department's unique Diamond Standard training system, which was questioned last year in an independent review board report on last year's fatal violence at the Select Lounge on the west side. (We wrote about it here). Diamond Standard "is so effective and so positive," King said, citing police officer reviews of the training. It is also always changing to meet new contingencies, he said. Barialaro said she was reviewing the department's "general orders," which she described as a 5-inch-thick manual. The orders—which are the same as policies and procedures—will be adjusted over the coming year or three to conform with the CALEA standards, she said. Most big city departments are not accredited under the program, officials said. Baltimore and Montgomery counties are accredited. Bealefeld said he had been working to improve training and other standards since he became chief in 2007, and that the changes have paid dividends. The crime lab is now accredited to national standards, he said, and the smarter, military-inspired training has cut annual arrest numbers from more than 100,000 in the early 2000s to 42,000 last year. He said the Diamond Standard Training cost amounted to about $250 per officer. "Jayne," Bealefeld said, addressing WBAL TV's Jayne Miller, "three years ago you were doing stories, some of them three blocks from here, about people hailing cops and they were driving by. We've been doing this [retraining] for a while—challenging ourselves to do it better tomorrow than we did it today." The Sun's Justin Fenton asked some of the most pointed questions. Citing the department's secrecy about its internal affairs investigations, Fenton asked whether his colleague, Peter Hermann, had broken the law in 2000 when he used to routinely attend the trial board hearings of city police facing disciplinary action. Bealefeld did not answer the question. The law that makes trial boards open did not change. Police policy did. Not sure why Fenton and Hermann didn't hammer that again in their own blog.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement