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Hopkins Astronomer Wins Physics Nobel

  [caption id="attachment_10773" align="alignleft" width="297" caption="Adam Riess (cour­tesy hubblesite.org)"][/caption] AP reports that Adam Riess will share the Nobel Prize in physics. He is a professor of astronomy and physics and a senior member of the Space Telescope Science Institute. The work for which he shares the prize (with American Saul Perlmutter and U.S.-Australian citizen Brian Schmidt) dates to 1998 when, as a member of a team looking at specific kinds of exploding stars (aka supernovas), he was able to calculate that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. This is seen as the first observational data confirming the existence of "dark energy," a still-unknown stuff theorized by physicists but never before seen in action. Before Riess's discovery, there was a hot debate: Would the universe expand forever or would the rate of expansion slow and eventually stop, perhaps reversing into a contraction dubbed "the big crunch"? The supernova data adds much weight to the theory that the universe will expand forever. In 2008, Symmetry magazine republished a key page from Riess's notebook. Here's what Nobel-worthy science looks like, in the raw.

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