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[caption id="attachment_10238" align="alignleft" width="290" caption="Vintage Labor Day Trade Card"][/caption] No news. No news about labor, on Labor Day, when unemployment is 9-plus percent and U-6 unemployment--which counts not only people without work seeking full-time employment, but also those who've become discouraged and stopped looking as well as those working part-time for economic reasons--is 16-plus percent. Lots of news about Sept. 11, 10 years later. News about the Grand Prix. (Which was certainly awesome!) News about European banks, "global gloom." The Wall Street Journal has a feature story about Jeff Immelt of General Electric. And one about how wealthy "campers" are hiring crews to set them up at Burning Man. No news about labor. But some opinion pieces in The Washington Post. (And stupid opinion at that: "The middle-class 'squeeze' long alleged by politicians is finally becoming reality. In the past it's been hyped.") Mother Jones has at least something. This chart idea is good, though the charts themselves aren't all great. At some point in the not too distant past, "labor" became, to the media, a special interest group; some small and shrinking subset of people with grievances that don't really matter to "us." How that happened--when "us" is people who work, or want to work--is one of the great unanswered (unasked, actually) questions of modern times.

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