Large workplace | No. 2: Brightview Senior Living

Special to The Baltimore Sun

Brightview Senior Living’s clients range from residents who live independently to those who need assistance, including seniors with memory issues and other conditions that require additional care.

“We have the opportunity to do something really good for people at what can be a very vulnerable time in their lives,” said Marilynn Duker, the CEO and one of the company’s partners.

Tammy Plumley joined Brightview’s Timonium location in 2002. Over the years she has worked as a concierge with seniors with dementia and veterans who served in Korea and Vietnam. She has heard stories from people who marched on Washington. In turn, she was on the receiving end of their warmth and support after the deaths of both of her parents.

“We genuinely care about our residents, and our residents care about us,” Plumley said.

Meanwhile, Brightview’s position as a privately held business has meant that making a profit hasn’t come at the expense of its clients and employees. For example, increases in health care premiums for staff have been kept low without cutting benefits. The company also offers tuition reimbursement, discounts on cellphone plans and transportation costs, and has a full-time wellness manager running employee programs.

“If you’re a great place to work, you’ll have highly-engaged associates. If you have highly-engaged associates, your residents will be satisfied,” Duker said. “If those two things happen, the financial results will follow.”

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And while the company is growing — with 13 locations in the Baltimore area and a total of 42 in eight states — it’s doing so in a deliberate manner.

“That allows us to ensure that when we open a new community, we have all the right people to work in it, that they’ve had time to get trained and really understand our culture,” Duker said.

And while the company is growing — with 13 locations in the Baltimore area and a total of 42 in eight states — it’s doing so in a deliberate manner.

“That allows us to ensure that when we open a new community, we have all the right people to work in it, that they’ve had time to get trained and really understand our culture,” Duker said.

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