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New plan presented for Woodberry site to replace stone houses that were abruptly demolished

Property owners who ran afoul of city officials and the Woodberry neighborhood in May when they demolished two 19th-century homes without notice are back with new development plans.

Neighbors did not know what to expect from those plans for the site on Clipper Road, which were to be presented to the community association Thursday evening by architects from JP2 Architects, according to a meeting agenda.

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An apartment building had been slated for the site, which had incorporated the old houses a nod to both the wishes of the immediate neighborhood and the broader effort to preserve the heritage of a historic city.

But in an unannounced move, a demolition crew took the structures apart before city officials, tipped off by neighbors and the local councilman, could issue a stop-work order. The move infuriated those who thought the issue had been settled for months. City inspectors later issued a $3,000 citation against the property owner and a $1,000 citation against the demolition contractor for not posting notice, not getting an on-site inspection and having an insufficient water supply.

The project faced cost pressures, but the developers at CLD Partners, architects at PI.KL Studio and a consultant on the project all said they didn’t know about the demolition plans and resigned. Katherine Jennings, the registered agent for the owner Woodberry Station LLC, never publicly explained the move.

She and JP2 didn’t respond to requests for comment. The new design effort was first reported by Baltimore Fishbowl.

City Councilman Leon F. Pinkett III, who had facilitated meetings with owners and developers of several Woodberry projects, has said the apartment project would have to begin over, both in planning and in winning back community trust.

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