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Baltimore tech firm Fearless wins major federal contract

Fearless, a Baltimore software company that has grown rapidly in the last two years, has won a lucrative federal contract worth as much as $120 million from a division of the federal government’s General Services Administration that will spur more growth.

The blanket purchase agreement — a streamlined deal that allows the government to order services from Fearless as needed, without having to allow other companies to bid on each project — with the government’s Technology Transformation Services runs for five years, according to a Thursday news release sent from the company. Fearless said it will focus its work on application development, data science, product, delivery and quality assurance.

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Greg Godbout, Fearless’ chief growth officer, said the GSA deal would be a “cornerstone contract” for the company. It has plans to double in size to a 300-employee company working with an additional 300 subcontractors, he said.

“This is really at one of the major intersections driving transformation inside the federal government,” Godbout said. “This contract, we believe, will be a big aspect of how they drive transformation in other agencies, making government more efficient and delivering world class services at a better price.”

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Founded in 2009 by Delali Dzirasa, the spouse of Baltimore Health Commissioner Dr. Letitia Dzirasa, the company will support President Joe Biden’s administration’s goals of streamlining governmental operations and investing in digital services.

The General Services Administration provides centralized services for other federal agencies, such as websites and digital services. The Technology Transformation Services division was founded to support that centralization.

Fearless, which worked out of offices in Baltimore before the coronavirus pandemic, has a number of federal contracts, including with the Small Business Administration, the Department of Defense and the Air Force. It also has worked with Baltimore City government officials, creating a dashboard to track so-called “hot spots” for opioid overdoses.

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