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What they're saying about Kevin Plank's letter

Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank urged support for the Port Covington project and proposed investing more than $100 million in recreation centers, job training, schools and parks in a full-page ad Wednesday in The Baltimore Sun.

Kevin Plank, Under Armour's founder and CEO, penned an open letter to Baltimore in a full-page advertisement in Wednesday's print edition of The Sun.

Plank's letter addressed his comments last week about Donald Trump. Plank said on CNBC that having "such a pro-business president is something that's a real asset to this country. People should grab that opportunity."

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Here's a look at what other media outlets are saying about the letter:

Axios.com speculated on the primary reason for Plank writing the letter:

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Why Plank is "clarifying" his comments: Some of Under Armour's biggest celebrity promoters — Stephen Curry, Dwayne "The Rock Johnson" and ballerina Misty Copeland — spoke out against Trump's travel ban and questioned Plank's comment.

SBNation.com's Alex Kirshner wrote that geography is what made Plank's initial comments particularly problematic.

Under Armour is arguably the most recognizable company in a deep blue state and city that both broke hard against Trump. Hillary Clinton beat Trump in Baltimore County, 56 percent to 38 percent, and obliterated him in Baltimore itself. Maryland went 60-34 for the Democratic ticket.

Under Armour's a national brand, but Plank's a Maryland guy, and his company is somewhat set in that image, too. Under Armour relies on close cooperation with Maryland policymakers, and many of its employees are Marylanders. This would be easier for the company if Under Armour were based in Arkansas. That it's based in Maryland has added to the political pressure on the boss.

Meanwhile, a Susquehanna International Group analyst predicted before the letter was published that Under Armour's stock and brand reputation would take a hit.

The long-term stock picker also predicts growth in the firm's $1 billion women's line and its online direct-to-consumer sales.

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