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Cars get the final inspection in the assembly line of the March and Versa models at Nissan's Industrial Complex in Resende, 160 km west of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Februrary 3, 2015. The Nissan plant in Brazil will be able to produce 200,000 cars and utility vehicles per year. The company aims to achieve 5 percent of the market share by 2016 in Brazil, the fourth largest automotive market in the world.
Cars get the final inspection in the assembly line of the March and Versa models at Nissan's Industrial Complex in Resende, 160 km west of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Februrary 3, 2015. The Nissan plant in Brazil will be able to produce 200,000 cars and utility vehicles per year. The company aims to achieve 5 percent of the market share by 2016 in Brazil, the fourth largest automotive market in the world. (YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP via Getty Images)

Q: I’ve never had good night vision and have always replaced my standard headlight bulbs with brighter ones. I recently took my 2016 Nissan Versa to the dealer for service and asked about replacement bulbs. The tech told me that it couldn’t be done because it would short out the battery.

I’ve never had a problem with this in any other car. Can you please advise me on this?

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— L.Z., Chicago

A: Short out the battery? I have never heard of such a thing. Your car uses a number H11 bulb available from various companies. Sylvania, for instance, offers the H11 bulb of various brightness (and cost). Their brightest is the zXe line.

Q: I recently read about G.W. of Chicago who owns 2019 Subaru Forester direct-injection engine. There are a couple of things that can be done, proactively, to avoid and remove some valve deposits, including the use of Top Tier gasoline or an aftermarket additive containing P.E.A. (polyether amine) a.k.a. Techron or others.

Using the additive every 7,000-10,000 miles (about every second oil change) should mitigate issues and reduce, eliminate and sometimes clean most deposit build-up. This will help avoid tearing the engine down. Using this regimen also keeps the injectors clean, allowing them to atomize fuel and improve mileage. Concerns of water vapor (moisture) and potential oil vapor are addressed by engine management systems and driving. Their effect can be mitigated by allowing the engine to warm up and driven to burn off as things reach normal operating temperatures.

— T.W., Mokena, Ill.

A: T.W. is a long-time chemist in the automotive field and one I have called on frequently to help us answer readers’ questions. By the way, amines are molecules that feature nitrogen, which may be a clue to gasoline brands that advertise having them, such as Shell, Chevron (Texaco), BP and more. Look for Top Tier brands.

Q: Here in Pennsylvania we do yearly inspections both for the vehicle’s roadworthiness and emissions. I was caught off guard the other day with an anomaly in a Bridgestone tire that had 16,000 miles on it. The inspector found a tiny nail on the inner edge of the tire and would not pass it and said it could not be repaired. So, $150 later I’m back in service.

Just curious if you think this was legitimate from the local Toyota dealership?

— J.M., Allentown, Pa.

A: What you call the edge is properly known as the shoulder of the tire. Punctures in the shoulder should not be repaired. The area between the shoulders — the part of the tire that meets the road — may be repaired.

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