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On Anne Frank and Holocaust heroes

I spent yesterday afternoon touring the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, always a very, very sobering experience. This time, I focused a bit more on the stories about those who courageously tried to rescue Jews amid the Nazi onslaught.

The most famous story, of course, is that of Anne Frank, whose family was hidden in an Amsterdam attic. They were discovered and sent to their deaths, but they live on thanks to "The Diary of a Young Girl," and the museum dedicated to their memory.

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There were similar tales of heroism in Denmark, France, Hungary and other countries. Of Jews spirited away by boat, hidden in cellars, concealed on farms. "Schindler's List" popularized another rescue effort, that of industrialist Oskar Schindler, but most of these heroes are unknown to the masses.

A pity, because each of their stories makes for remarkable reading. You can get a sampling at the Yad Vashem memorial, which pays tribute to a group called The Righteous among the Nations. Or through the museum's multimedia selection.


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