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will mark its fifth anniversary of spicing Baltimore's musical life with an exceptionally promising mix of repertoire and performers.

2011-2012 also marks Mobtown's first untethered season. The organization, curated and co-founded by stellar sax player Brian Sacawa, began as an affiliate of the Contemporary Museum, which had a change in management last year. For its fifth year, Mobtown is going independent. More on that in a moment. Back to the music.

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The season opens with a performance by one of the hottest groups on the international new music scene, the JACK Quartet, performing the complete string quartets of Iannis Xenakis Sept. 14 at the 2640 Space.

The Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble, which has made some very hot recordings, will ...

make its Baltimore debut on the Mobtown series with a program of music from the first decade of the 21st century Nov. 9 at the 2640 Space.

Mobtown's annual tradition of performing Phil Kline's "Unsilent Night" for boom boxes will be held Dec. 3, starting at the Pratt Southeast Anchor Library.

On Jan. 26 at the Windup Space, Mobtown will deliver a sequel to last season's terrific account of "Glassworks" with the performance of another gem by Baltimore's own Philip Glass, "Music with Changing Parts."

The centennial of John Cage in 2012 will be commemorated by Mobtown with a recital on Feb. 15 (venue TBD) by pianist Adam Tendler, who will play the composer's Sonatas and Interludes for prepared piano. Mobtown is planning another Cage event during the season -- "Musicircus," a work from 1967 that involves multiple ensembles and the element of chance. More details are promised later.

The season also includes a performance April 15 at Windup Space by bass clarinetist virtuoso Michael Lowenstern, whose style Sacawa describes as "ClassicoFunkTronica."

Back to the post-Contemporary Museum state for Mobtown Modern. To help maintain its independence and its future, an online fundraising campaign through Kickstarter has begun. The goal is $5,000, to be used toward fees for artists and an audio technician, as well as administrative costs. 

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