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What was Stephen Colbert thinking about Werner Herzog?

I still can't wait to see Werner Herzog's 3-D "Cave of Forgotten Dreams," which opens June 17 at the Cinemark. Even the film's harshest critic, J. Hoberman in The Village Voice, calls it "One of the few justifiable recent excursions into 3-D" for its documentation of "a secret wonder of the world, the Chauvet cave—a subterranean gallery of 300 animal images discovered in 1994 in the South of France."

All this -- and albino crocodiles.

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Yes: albino crocs.

After watching Herzog's Mad Artist appearance on "The Colbert Report" last night, I wondered why other reviewers haven't emphasized the director's discovery (in Hoberman's words) of "a nearby nuclear facility that has generated a tropical biosphere populated by mutant albino crocodiles."

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Herzog asks, "Looking at the paintings—what will they [the crocodiles] make of them?"

Hoberman calls this question "the ultimate head-scratcher."

I beg to differ.

The ultimate head-scratcher is, "What would the crocodiles make of Herzog?"

Watch the auteur match loony-tune wits with Stephen Colbert, and then tell me -- what did Colbert make of him last night?Herzog rambled on, with a smile, about albino crocodiles and the Manhattan phonebook. The audience roared like, well, grizzly men.

And the camera stayed off Colbert's face for an unprecedented length of time.

Did the show's director think it would unduly slam a distinguished artist to depict Colbert's confusion or disbelief?

Please, Colbert Nation: post some alternative angles. But for now, let's enjoy this madcap partial view.

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