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The New York Times media columnist and reporter David Carr has garnered the most attention of anyone depicted in "Page One: Inside the New York Times," with good reason. Andrew Rossi's documentary, which opens Friday at the Charles, builds to Carr's hair-raising expose of the Chicago Tribune's ownership and top management from December 2007 to October 2010: "At Flagging Tribune, Tales of a Bankrupt Culture." (Tribune CEO Randy Michaels resigned roughly two weeks after it appeared.) In "Page One," Carr's fearless, detailed, artful reporting, and the support he receives from the Times, illustrate, superbly, the enterprise and commitment that seem to be fading away as newsroom-based print journals disappear into the online ether.

But the key character in this documentary is Brian Stelter, who graduated from Towson University in May 2007 and became a Times media reporter just two months later. Stelter had created TV Newser -- which a CBS blogger once called, simply, "a must-read blog covering television news." He's the increasingly rare journalist who made a huge name for himself in new media and then took a job in print.

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The film depicts Stelter as a hopeful figure, bridging tradition and innovation. He may have three screens of different sizes open at his desk at all times, but they focus rather than distract him. In the course of "Page One," he cracks such revelatory stories as the emergence of WikiLeaks and the radical downsizing of White House coverage at the major networks.

Carr, who is Old School at heart, cracks that he sometimes theorizes that Stelter is a robot created to destroy him. But the film suggests that Stelter and other young journalists, who join cutting-edge technology to solid news values, could revitalize institutions like the Times. On Monday, Stelter posted on his website, "I'm writing a book about morning TV.

"Tentatively titled 'The Top Of The Morning,' it's going to be about 'Today,' 'Good Morning America' and the other morning shows that collectively set the nation's breakfast table every day.

"The publisher, Grand Central, described it thusly to Publishers Weekly: 'A candid look at the surreal lives of the surrogate families that we invite into our homes each morning -- and why the shows matter so much to the fragmenting television business.' "

Up-the-minute (or -nanosecond) as always, he then asked readers to "sign up for the book's Tumblr, my reporter's notebook/scrapbook," and answer his question, "What do you want to know about the morning TV wars?"

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