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A shot of wry

In b, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication for people much younger than me, today's article on the unpleasantness between Jen Royle and Nestor Aparicio,* this quotation appears:

"I thought she did a very good job acclimating herself to Baltimore from New York," says former Orioles catcher turned broadcaster, Rick Dempsey. "She's a brutally honest reporter with a rye sense of humor, which is very refreshing. She takes her job very seriously. She puts her time in and she does her homework."

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You can make bread with rye, and you can make whiskey with rye, but you cannot make humor with a cereal grain. The homonym wry, meaning dry or mocking, comes to us not from the fruited plain but from the Old English wrigan, "tend," "incline," which gained the sense of "contort" in Middle English. In a wry expression, the face is twisted.

Not that I am micturating from a great height on b; The Sun's features section once published a remark about the "rye humor" of the comic Ziggy, earning a newsbreak in The New Yorker.

*Who make me think of that thing I say about baseball.

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