xml:space="preserve">
As Egypt burns, ElBaradei book gets hotter

In a bid to capitalize -- literally -- on the protests in Egypt, a publisher has moved up the release date of Mohammed ElBaradei's book, "The Age of Deception." The international release, orginally scheduled for June, has been shifted to April 26th, "due to recent events and bookseller demand," publisher Macmillan said.

It's great that we won't have to wait so long to hear ElBaradei's take on nuclear proliferation and his time as director general of the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency. I just wish the book could include some of the intrigue taking place in Egypt right now. If ever there was a need for e-books -- works that can be prepared and distributed quickly -- this is it.

Advertisement

Here's how Macmillan describes the book: "For the first time, the Nobel laureate and "man in the middle" of the planet's most explosive confrontations speaks out—on his dealings with America, negotiations with Iran, and the prospects for a nuclear-free future."

When the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency elected an unknown lawyer as its director, few could have predicted the role Mohamed ElBaradei would play in the most high-stakes conflicts of our time. Contending with the Bush administration's assault on Iraq, the nuclear aspirations of North Korea, and the West's standoff with Iran, ElBaradei emerged as a lone independent voice, unique in maintaining credibility in the Arab world and the West alike. For their efforts to control nuclear proliferation, ElBaradei and his agency received the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize.

Now, in a vivid and thoughtful account, ElBaradei takes us inside the nuclear fray. Inspector, consultant, and carrier of messages, he moves from Baghdad, where Iraqi officials bleakly predict the coming war, to behind-the-scenes exchanges with Condoleezza Rice, to the streets of Pyongyang and the trail of Pakistani nuclear smugglers. He dissects the possibility of rapprochement with Iran, all the while rejecting hard-line ideologies of every kind, decrying an us-versus-them approach, and insisting on the necessity of relentless diplomacy. "We have no other choice," ElBaradei says, "the other option is unthinkable."

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement